Chapter_8 - Chapter 8 shAring the rOAD with Others New...

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Unformatted text preview: Chapter 8 shAring the rOAD with Others New Jersey Driver MaNual www.njmvc.gov 131 Pedestrians Mature Drivers Visually Challenged Persons Motorcycles Trucks, Tractor-Trailers and Buses No-Zone Principle Motorized Scooters Low-Speed Vehicles 132 133 134 135 135 137 139 140 sharing the Road with Others It is important for a motorist to remember that he/she is not the only one using the roadways. From people to animals to other types of vehicles, it is a motorists responsibility to know how to safely share the road with others. PEOPlE PeDestriAns Pedestrians are the second largest category of motor vehicle deaths and injuries in New Jersey. Children and older people are often victims of traffic accidents. In 2006, the U.S. Department of Transportation Fatality Analysis Reporting System reported 4,784 total pedestrian deaths. New Jersey had 171 pedestrian deaths in 2006. Unfortunately, many of the measures that make roads safer for motorists, such as large medians and wide shoulders, make those roads more treacherous for pedestrians. Vehicle-pedestrian collisions have a five percent fatality rate if the car is going 20 mph, but the rate jumps to 85 percent at 40 mph. Pedestrian activity is at its greatest in densely developed areas, such as cities and town centers, but it also is significant in neighborhoods and along and across suburban roadways. Motorists should take special precautions to watch for pedestrians. In most cases, pedestrians have the right-of-way at all intersections. There is a crosswalk at every intersection, even if it is not painted as such. This is known as an unmarked crosswalk. Motorists are prohibited from blocking the crosswalk when stopped at a red light or stop sign. A motorist must not stop with a portion of his/her vehicle in the crosswalk area. When a motorist blocks a crosswalk, it forces pedestrians to go around a vehicle, putting them in danger. A motorist must stop and remain stopped for a pedestrian who is crossing at a crosswalk (marked or unmarked) until the pedestrian completes his/her crossing, unless traveling along the half of the roadway on the other side of a safety island from the pedestrian. Motorists who fail to yield to pedestrians or who overtake and pass vehicles that are stopped for pedestrians are subject to a $100 fine and up to 15 days in jail (N.J.S.A. 39:4-36). shAring the rOAD with Others New Jersey Driver MaNual www.njmvc.gov 133 Never pass a vehicle stopped at a crosswalk (N.J.S.A. 39:4-36). This frequently causes severe injury or death to pedestrians, especially if the passing vehicle is traveling at a high speed. When stopping for a crosswalk on a multi-lane road, a motorist should stop about 30 feet before a crosswalk to avoid blocking visibility of a motorist in the second lane....
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This note was uploaded on 08/04/2010 for the course EAG 12314 taught by Professor Eafadsf during the Spring '10 term at A.T. Still University.

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Chapter_8 - Chapter 8 shAring the rOAD with Others New...

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