WEEK 6 PSY 2

WEEK 6 PSY 2 - Lesson:MotivationandEmotion...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–5. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Lesson: Motivation and Emotion
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Page Title: Lesson Introduction Page Number: 1 What motivates you to get up in the morning? For that matter, what are the motives behind your  actions each and every day?      We are motivated every day to meet our wants and needs. In addition to our motivations, we  explore a world of human emotions and how those emotions are connected to our thoughts and  actions.  This lesson introduces you to: Understanding motivation Exploring the origins and influences of emotions
Background image of page 2
Page Title: Lesson Objectives Page Number: 2 At the end of this lesson, you should be able to: Define motivation Describe the theories and perspectives on motivation Identify the different types of motivation and their nature Describe emotions–the basis, biological basis, and its expression Discuss the causes and effects of personal happiness and individual differences  in perspectives on emotions   Page Title: Menu Page Page Number: 3 This lesson presents the following topics: What Is Motivation? Social Components of Hunger Emotion Page Title: What Is Motivation? Page Number: 4 Motivation  [The process by which activities are started, directed, and continued so that physical  or psychological needs or wants are met] is the process by which activities are started, directed,  and continued so that physical or psychological needs or wants are met. It is what moves you to  do the things that you do.  Motivation can be receiving an external reward, such as pay for your job. It can also be  extrinsic  [Type of motivation in which a person performs an action because it leads to an outcome that is  separate from or external to the person], where an action is performed because it leads to an  outcome that is separate from or external to the person. An example is tipping a waiter in a  restaurant.  Humans and animals all have biologically determined and innate patterns of behavior called  instincts  [Approach to motivation that assumes people are governed by instincts similar to those  of animals]. For animals, it is to mate and protect territory. In humans, examples include eating  when hungry or running away when threatened.
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Page Title: Needs and Drives Page Number: 5 need  [A requirement of some material (such as food or water) that is essential for survival of  the organism] is a requirement that is essential for survival, such as food or water. When we act  to fulfill this need and reduce the tension the lack of it causes, it is called  drive  [A psychological  tension and physical arousal arising when there is a need that motivates the organism to act in 
Background image of page 4
Image of page 5
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Page1 / 16

WEEK 6 PSY 2 - Lesson:MotivationandEmotion...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 5. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online