COR850_2.2 - O bje c t 1 The second principle of effective...

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Unformatted text preview: O bje c t 1 The second principle of effective classification is the need principle. According to the need principle, there are two distinct types of offender service needs: General needs may include housing, medical care, and other basic needs that, while important to address, are not necessarily associated with the offenders criminal behavior; criminogenic needs are dynamic factors that are directly associated with the offenders delinquent or criminal behavior. It is these latter factors that must be targeted for change if we hope to reduce offenders likelihood of future criminal behavior. Although these criminogenic needs are different for each offender, the most common criminogenic needs are antisocial attitudes, antisocial peers, and antisocial personality characteristics. So, how do we go about identifying offenders criminogenic needs? Traditionally, needs assessments have been conducted as a supplement to risk assessment that is, a broad array of problem areas, both general and criminogenic, are examined through the use of a separate instrument. In this case, needs assessment is not used to predict future behavior, but rather to identify areas of need. More contemporary practices have used to predict future behavior, but rather to identify areas of need....
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COR850_2.2 - O bje c t 1 The second principle of effective...

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