COR850_6 - O bje c t 1 Working Effectively With Female...

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Unformatted text preview: O bje c t 1 Working Effectively With Female Offenders Last week, we examined how the principles of effective correctional intervention could be applied to a specific type of offender treatment. This week’s lesson focuses on how these principles can be used to guide the effective treatment of female offenders. In this brief lecture, I will highlight some of the trends in female delinquency that have captured the attention of policy makers. Let’s start by taking a look at how popular culture has changed in terms of its characterization of girls. Are you familiar with these books and movies? How are girls characterized? They are characterized as mean, backstabbing. Have you seen the “you Tube” videos that show girls fighting? And think about recent television and movie roles? Female roles have toughened up a bit. Along with this trend in popular culture, crime statistics are characterizing females as meaner, tougher. The rate of arrests for girls in 2006 was 27 percent above the 1980 rate. And the proportion of delinquency cases involving females has increased. In 2006, girls accounted for 29 percent of all juvenile arrests. Even more disconcerting, are the reports of increased violence among girls. According to official arrest data on cases reported to the police, the rate of arrests for simple assault among juvenile girls has increased by abut 24% from 1980. Consequently, girls account for a higher proportion of cases on probation and a higher proportion of commitments to secure facilities. These numbers have led people to begin speculating about gender convergence in delinquency. Throughout time and place there has always been a gender gap in delinquency; that is, delinquency has always been a male domain. This gap is narrowing, however, and causing people to speculate as to why that is happening. male domain....
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COR850_6 - O bje c t 1 Working Effectively With Female...

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