COR856_4.3 - O bje c t 1 Religion The freedom of religion...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–2. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Unformatted text preview: O bje c t 1 Religion The freedom of religion clause of the First Amendment protects two different, but related rights. First, it protects ones right to be free from a government established religion, also known as the Establishment Clause. Second, it protects the freedom to exercise religion also known as the Free Exercise Clause, which means that you both have the freedom to exercise the religion of your choice AND you have the freedom of NOT exercising a religion. So there are two main questions to ponder when looking at the legal issues surrounding religion. First, what constitutes a legitimate religion? Second, what are the legal requirements are necessary for a religion to meet constitutional muster? The Court ruled in the 1975 case Lipp v. Procunier that there are four characteristics to look for in a legitimate religion. Also referred to as the Lipp Test, those characteristics are: Cardinal Characteristics Supreme Being Religious discipline Tenets to guide daily existence...
View Full Document

This note was uploaded on 08/08/2010 for the course COR 856 taught by Professor Dr.kevinminor during the Fall '08 term at E. Kentucky.

Page1 / 2

COR856_4.3 - O bje c t 1 Religion The freedom of religion...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 2. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online