LECTURE OUTLINE - LECTURE OUTLINES FOR Global Citizenship...

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LECTURE OUTLINES FOR “Global Citizenship” by Kwame Anthony Appiah The Roots of Cosmopolitanism The first person to claim that he was a citizen of the world— kosmou polites in Greek of which the word “cosmopolitan” comes from—was a man called Diogenes. Diogenes was was born sometime late in the fifth century B.C.E. in Sinope, on the southern coast of the Black Sea, in what is now Turkey. (p.1) From Diogenes, there are three ideas that are still referenced: (1) We do not need a single world government; but (2) we must care for the fate of all human beings inside and outside our own societies; and (3) we have much to gain from conversation with one another across our differences. (p.2) When the idea of cosmopolitanism was taken up again in the European Enlightenment, it had the same core: global concern for humanity without a wish for world government. (p.3) Today, modern cosmopolitanism grew with modern nationalism—not as an alternative to it, but as a complement to it. That is, at its heart is the idea of universality, concern for all humanity as fellow citizens, as well as the value of different human ways of doing things. As such, it does not go with world government—because different communities are entitled to live according to
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LECTURE OUTLINE - LECTURE OUTLINES FOR Global Citizenship...

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