Feb1_Maxwell's equation_With_Notes_From_Michal

Feb1_Maxwell's equation_With_Notes_From_Michal - Ray Optics...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–6. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Unformatted text preview: Ray Optics vs Wave Optics Why the need for Wave Optics? Examples of instances where Ray Optics is not a good enough approximation: Naively this is how a lens work A simple lens requires wave optics to describe its detail operation! Maxwells equations Assumption 1 : Source free (charge does not generate THz) E =- B t H =- D t + j D = B = Maxwells equations are then: Electrical and Magnetic Permeability B = H D = E Assumption 2 : , are linear (independent of field strength) . In Vacuum In non-vacuum the assum ption is valid at low intensities. In m ost crystals the m aterial becom es non-linear when Intensity~ 10 20 W / m 2 Assum ing I can focus down the light, what is the power of the laser I need? When is it valid? Assumption 3: Isotropic B = H D = E , m u and eps are tensors Electrical and Magnetic Permeability Note: we are NOT assum ing the m aterial is not hom ogenous Is the assumption realistic? lets look at common materials GaAs Glass (SiO 2 ) = 8.85 10- 12 F/m (Faradays/m) = 4 10- 7 Henry/m Maxwells equations for...
View Full Document

Page1 / 15

Feb1_Maxwell's equation_With_Notes_From_Michal - Ray Optics...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 6. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online