Sisal and seagrass maintenance

Sisal and seagrass maintenance - Sisal and seagrass are...

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Sisal and seagrass are relatively easy to maintain. The hard, natural vegetable fibers do not attract dust, and bacteria cannot penetrate the fibers. Sand and fine dirt do not damage sisal or seagrass carpets as they do conventional floor coverings; the soil filters through the weave, rather than sits on the surface. Both sisal and seagrass are tough, natural fibers which are less vulnerable to abrasion. Fiber Characteristics As with other yarns made of vegetable fibers, both sisal and seagrass have variations in size, shade, and tendency to return to their original color after exposure to sunlight. Slight weaving and shade irregularity are common characteristics. Shade differences between areas exposed/unexposed to sunlight may be apparent (underneath furniture, behind picture hangings, etc.). Fading due to direct exposure to sunlight is uniform, resembling the tones of unfinished wood. Maintenance Regular vacuuming with a strong brush-suction is all that is needed for daily care of sisal and seagrass carpets. The beater-type cleaner is not as effective due to the weave. The strong suction of the vacuum pulls out the fine dirt which has accumulated between the fibers and on the underlay. Although the need may not be visible, this frequent and regular vacuuming will increase carpet life by preventing soil build-up, and will help eliminate stains caused when spilled liquids dissolve soil accumulations. If exposed to dryness or low humidity, a frequent, light and even application of water strengthens these natural vegetable fibers and enhances the wearing qualities. Moisture can be applied by spraying, light sprinkling, clean mop, damp brush, or any device that would give a light and even
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This note was uploaded on 08/10/2010 for the course INTB AND T 3352 taught by Professor Newmanandpriest during the Spring '09 term at University of Houston.

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Sisal and seagrass maintenance - Sisal and seagrass are...

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