Blood Spots in Eggs Kashrut com.docx - Blood Spots in Eggs Compiled by Rabbi Moishe Dovid Lebovits from Halachically Speaking Volume 4 Issue 18

Blood Spots in Eggs Kashrut com.docx - Blood Spots in Eggs...

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Blood Spots in Eggs Compiled by Rabbi Moishe Dovid Lebovits from Halachically Speaking Volume 4 Issue 18 Halachically Speaking is a bi-weekly publication compiled by Rabbi Moishe Dovid Lebovits, a former chaver kollel of Yeshiva Torah Vodaath and a musmach of Horav Yisroel Belsky Shlita. Rabbi Lebovits currently works as the Rabbinical Administrator for the KOF-K Kosher Supervision . Copyright © 2008 Halachically Speaking. Reprinted with permission of Rabbi Lebovits. Reviewed by Rabbi Benzion Schiffenbauer Shlita All Piskei Horav Yisroel Belsky Shlita are reviewed by Horav Yisroel Belsky Shlita Blood Spots in Eggs While preparing a dish for cooking, one is often unsure if he has to check the eggs for blood spots. In addition, companies receive eggs in various forms and the question arises if these eggs need to be checked? Does the halacha of checking for blood spots apply today? If it does, who is required to check to see if there are blood spots in the eggs? These issues and others will be discussed at length below. Background In past years, most eggs came from fertile hens, whose hormone levels stimulated more egg production. Today, this is not the case. The hormones are stimulated artificially, the chickens themselves are not fertile and the eggs will not develop into chickens. About a hundred years ago, chicken farms became very common. On a chicken farm only chickens are raised. The chickens only produce eggs and they are not killed for consumption. Chickens which are used for the production of eggs can produce eggs every day of the year. The Issur It is forbidden for one to eat any blood found in an egg. The reason is not related to the issur of eating blood, 1 but is because the blood in the egg is an indication that a new embryo is forming, and it is forbidden to eat an embryo. 2 Blood Spots In the times of the Gemorah , 3 blood appeared in eggs because of two reasons: 1. The egg had been fertilized and a chicken embryo was being produced. 2. An irregularity in the hen causes a small amount of blood to be deposited in the egg. In the United States, the government requires that Grade A and Grade AA eggs be checked for blood spots, through a procedure called candling. During the candling, the eggs are held before a light in a dark room allowing any blood spots to be easily detected. Accordingly, the chance of finding a blood spot is rare. 4 The Halacha
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The Gemorah in Chullin 5 quotes the halacha of blood spots in eggs. There is a discussion in the poskim as to the exact parameters of this issur . Most say that any blood found in the egg because of fertilization is ossur and the egg must be discarded. 6 Some say it depends on where the blood is found: only in the yolk (yellow part of the egg), in the albumin (egg white) or in both the yolk and the albumin.
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  • Fall '97
  • WREN
  • Egg white, Egg yolk, Egg dishes, Harav Yisroel Belsky Shlita

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