534 Report - BME/IOE 534 Homework 3 Analyzing the Safety of...

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BME/IOE 534 Homework 3 – Analyzing the Safety of the Barbell Squat Using 3D Static Strength Prediction Program Professor Bernard Martin Signatures and Percent Contribution Alberto Alafaro: Contribution: 30% Adam Biddle: Contribution: 20% Ali Khanzadi: Contribution: 20% Howard Wu: Contribution: 30%
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Introduction Squatting is a lower-body exercise that trains the calves, quadriceps, lower back, and gluteal muscles. It is a very common exercise for many body builders and is considered essential for increasing the strength and size of the legs and buttocks. The squat involves supporting a loaded barbell placed on the shoulders while performing a series of motions of first standing upright; then bending at hips, knees, and low back to lower the body; then reversing the motion to stand upright (see Figure 1 for a depiction of a squat). Additionally, squat postures can vary in terms of the distance that the upper body is lowered before returning to the upright position (squat depth) and the distance between the feet (squat stance). Figure 1. Motion of a Squat (Returning from Bottom Squat Position to Initial Upright Position) There is much controversy on the subject of squatting’s influence on knee and lumbar vertebrae injuries. This report seeks to find the safest postures at the lowest point of the squat for a 50 th percentile male novice body builder to help minimize L4/L5 disc compression and knee moments and maximize 50 th percentile male population strength capability at the knee joints when using a typical beginner barbell weight of 135 lbs. While maximizing safety is the main issue, preserving the goals of the population who perform this exercise—to increase muscle recruitment and maximize muscle mass paired with maximizing the squat’s range of motion, will also be accounted for in the final recommended posture. Methods and Materials Assumptions Our methods for this experiment were based on the following assumptions: -No co-contraction of muscles during the squat -No effect of ligaments -No friction -Isometric postures -The barbell would provide equal weight distribution on the right and left shoulders -The motion of the squat would be performed symmetrically across the sagittal plane -Equilibrium of force and moments
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-The subject in the experiment is a good representation of the 50 th percentile male (5’10; 170 lbs). -The subject’s posture does not deviate much from a 50 th percentile male’s -The subject’s weight distribution and link lengths are similar to a 50 th percentile male’s -Effects of fatigue and frequency -Symmetric exertion of forces of muscles across the sagittal plane -Assumptions on anthropometry: symmetrical weight distribution, link length fractions used in 3D SSPP -Moment arm and L5/S1 orientation angle used in 3D SSPP is accurate -Back muscle force acts parallel to the L5/S1 compression force -The location of the wrist joint can be approximated by the location of the ends of the barbell because the hands are holding the bar
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This note was uploaded on 08/10/2010 for the course IOE 534 taught by Professor Martin during the Winter '10 term at University of Michigan.

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534 Report - BME/IOE 534 Homework 3 Analyzing the Safety of...

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