chap1_061 - 100-ktisotachs. C. With these isotachs in...

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42 CHAPTER 1 Laboratory Exercises Laboratory Exercise 11 "The wind direction and speed portions of the station model ("wind barbs") at approximately 10,500 m (-34,000 ft) altitude at 12Z on May 6, 2008. 11. As we will discuss in detail later in the book, winds at high altitudes play a significant role in shaping the weather conditions at the earth's surface. Figure 1.38 shows the wind direction and speed portions of the station model ("wind barbs") at approximately 10,500 m (-34,000 ft) altitude at 12Z on May 6, 2008. a. In order to prepare the map for isoplething and to get practice at decoding wind barbs, write the corre- sponding wind speed on each wind barb. b. Isopleths of equal wind speed are called isotachs (pronounced iso-tacks). Draw the 60-kt, 80-kt, and
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Unformatted text preview: 100-ktisotachs. C. With these isotachs in place, you should be able to identify a channel of faster winds over the mid-latitudes that generally stretches in an west-to-east direction, with some north-south undulations. This corridor of higher wind speed is the "jet stream," which will be discussed in more detail in Chapter 7. Draw a heavy dark line to represent the jet stream. 12. Figure 1.39 is a meteogram from Harrisburg, PA on February 17, 2003, during the height of the storm that became known as "President's Day Snowstorm II" because it occurred on President's Day that year (and there had been a previous blockbuster snowstorm along the East Coast on President's Day 1979). The hour (in UTC) is across the bottom....
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