Biomedical Ethics_1 (1)

Biomedical Ethics_1 (1) - Biomedical Ethics ENGR 213 Click...

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Click to edit Master subtitle style 8/13/10 ENGR 213 Biomedical Ethics
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8/13/10 Learning Objectives Define and distinguish between the terms moral and ethics Present the rationale underlying utilitarianism and non-consequentialism Present the codes of ethics for health professions and biomedical engineering Identify moral dilemmas which arise from the two moral norms: beneficence and non-maleficence Discuss the moral judgments associated
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8/13/10 Outline Definition of terms Two Moral Norms Human Experimentation Medical Research Medical Device Regulation Marketing of Medical Products
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8/13/10 Introduction Consider the following headline. Transplant Surgeon Charged With Hastening Patient's Death For Organs San Luis Obispo, CA--A San Francisco transplant surgeon was charged on July 31 with administering drugs to speed up the death of a man with disabilities -- in order to harvest his organs. Prosecutors say that in February 2006 Dr. Hootan Roozrokh gave excessive amounts of pain and anti-anxiety medication to 26-year-old Rubin Navarro,
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8/13/10 Comments The surgeon was acquitted of any wrong- doing with regards to this case, yet the idea of the boundary between life and death, life-sustaining technologies, and extreme measures as well as others are illustrated here.
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8/13/10 Reflection In what ways has our ability to sustain and/ or extend life through technology affected what might be considered morally or ethically correct? Is it right to end a life pre-maturely to help others?
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8/13/10 Another Perspective Answers will vary here, but some ideas to consider might be cost to society, quality of life, cost to the individual, sanctity of life, the wishes of the individual and family, avoidance of suffering, etc. One of many problems with this case is that Mr. Navarro’s organs
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Biomedical Ethics_1 (1) - Biomedical Ethics ENGR 213 Click...

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