Lecture 5 - Biomaterials II Learning Objectives Discuss...

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iomaterials II Biomaterials II
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Learning Objectives ± Discuss requirements for orthopaedic evices devices ± List requirements for joint replacements iscuss ow surface modification can ± Discuss how surface modification can improve biomaterials
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Some Orthopaedic pplications Applications
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OUCH!
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OUCH! Hey, we can fix that!
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IM Nails in the Femur
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Some Mechanics Issues ± Kinematics tress Analysis ± Stress Analysis ± Device Size ± MORE LATER…
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Joint replacement. ± Joint replacement
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Materials Issues in Joints ± Low Friction igh ± High Hardness ± Fatigue Resistance ± Elastic Properties
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Friction…Less is Better
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Responses to Foreign Objects ± Bone lossleading to loosening 1. Caused by sub-micron size particles (wear debris) -Hardness 2. Stress shielding - tiffness (Elastic Modulus) Stiffness (Elastic Modulus) 3. Infection ± Fracture ± Pain ± Development of an allergic response orrosion products ± Corrosion products ± Metallosis
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A Joint Gone Bad…
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Composite Femoral Stem ± Composite EPOCH femoral stems are ± 75% less stiff than a comparable cobalt-chromium 0% less stiff than a comparable titanium alloy implant ± 50% less stiff than a comparable titanium alloy implant. ± These implants have a cobalt-chromium alloy core surrounded by a flexible polymer material. ± The exterior surface is composed of a titanium fiber mesh that is designed to encourage bone in-growth ± Smaller sizes of the EPOCH Hip are manufactured from a titanium alloy and have a porous titanium fiber surface, but do not have the polymer middle layer found in the larger sizes.
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Composite Stem PolyaryletherKetone CoCr lloy orous Titanium Porous Titanium
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This note was uploaded on 08/13/2010 for the course ENGR ENGR 213 taught by Professor Griffin during the Spring '10 term at Cal Poly.

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Lecture 5 - Biomaterials II Learning Objectives Discuss...

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