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Unformatted text preview: x – y < 0 (E) 2x > y www.petersons.com Inequalities 233 1. ALGEBRAIC INEQUALITIES Algebraic inequality statements are solved in the same manner as equations. However, do not forget that whenever you multiply or divide by a negative number, the order of the inequality, that is, the inequality symbol must be reversed. In reading the inequality symbol, remember that it points to the smaller quantity. a < b is read a is less than b. a > b is read a is greater than b. Example: Solve for x: 12 – 4x < 8 Solution: Add –12 to each side. –4x < –4 Divide by –4, remembering to reverse the inequality sign. x>1 Example: 6x + 5 > 7x + 10 Solution: Collect all the terms containing x on the left side of the equation and all numerical terms on the right. As with equations, remember that if a term comes from one side of the inequality to the other, that term changes sign. –x > 5 Divide (or multiply) by –1. x < –5 www.petersons.com 234 Chapter 14 Exercise 1 Work out each problem. Circle the letter that appears before your answer. 1. Solve for x: 8x < 5(2x + 4) (A) x > – 10 (B) x < – 10 (C) x > 10 (D) x < 10 (E) x < 18 Solve for x: 6x + 2 – 8x < 14 (A) x = 6 (B) x = –6 (C) x > –6 (D) x < –6 (E) x > 6 A number increased by 10 is greater than 50. What numbers satisfy this condition? (A) x > 60 (B) x < 60 (C) x > –40 (D) x < 40 (E) x > 40 Solve for x: –.4x < 4 (A) x > –10 (B) x > 10 (C) x < 8 (D) x < –10 (E) x < 36 Solve for x: .03n > –.18 (A) n < –.6 (B) n > .6 (C) n > 6 (D) n > –6 (E) n < –6 Solve for b: 15b < 10 (A) (B) (C) (D) (E) 3 2 3 b> 2 b< b<− 2 3 2 b> 3 b< 3 2 7. If x2 < 4, then (A) x > 2 (B) x < 2 (C) x > –2 (D) –2 < x < 2 (E) –2 ≤ x ≤ 2 Solve for n: n + 4.3 < 2.7 (A) n > 1.6 (B) n > –1.6 (C) n < 1.6 (D) n < –1.6 (E) n = 1.6 If x < 0 and y < 0, which of the following is always true? (A) x + y >...
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This note was uploaded on 08/15/2010 for the course MATH a4d4 taught by Professor Colon during the Spring '10 term at Embry-Riddle FL/AZ.

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