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Sexton07 - Subscriber access provided by ARIZONA STATE UNIV LIBRARIES Article Resistive-Pulse Studies of Proteins and Protein/Antibody Complexes

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Subscriber access provided by ARIZONA STATE UNIV LIBRARIES Journal of the American Chemical Society is published by the American Chemical Society. 1155 Sixteenth Street N.W., Washington, DC 20036 Article Resistive-Pulse Studies of Proteins and Protein/Antibody Complexes Using a Conical Nanotube Sensor Lindsay T. Sexton, Lloyd P. Horne, Stefanie A. Sherrill, Gregory W. Bishop, Lane A. Baker, and Charles R. Martin J. Am. Chem. Soc. , 2007 , 129 (43), 13144-13152• DOI: 10.1021/ja0739943 • Publication Date (Web): 06 October 2007 Downloaded from http://pubs.acs.org on March 31, 2009 More About This Article Additional resources and features associated with this article are available within the HTML version: Supporting Information Links to the 6 articles that cite this article, as of the time of this article download Access to high resolution figures Links to articles and content related to this article Copyright permission to reproduce figures and/or text from this article
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Resistive-Pulse Studies of Proteins and Protein/Antibody Complexes Using a Conical Nanotube Sensor Lindsay T. Sexton, Lloyd P. Horne, Stefanie A. Sherrill, Gregory W. Bishop, Lane A. Baker, ² and Charles R. Martin* Contribution from the Department of Chemistry and Center for Research at the Bio/Nano Interface, Uni V ersity of Florida, Gaines V ille, Florida 32611-7200 Received June 1, 2007; E-mail: [email protected] Abstract: There is increasing interest in using nanopores in synthetic membranes as resistive-pulse sensors for molecular and macromolecule analytes. In general, this method entails measuring current pulses associated with translocation of the analyte through the nanopore sensor element. A key challenge for this sensing paradigm is building selectivity into the protocol so that the current pulses for the target analyte can be distinguished from current pulses for other species that might be present in the sample. We show here that this can be accomplished with a protein analyte by adding to the solution an antibody that selectively binds the protein. We demonstrate this concept using bovine serum albumin (BSA) and a Fab fragment from a BSA-binding polyclonal antibody. Because the complex formed upon binding of the Fab to BSA is larger than the free BSA molecule, the current-pulse signature for the BSA/Fab complex can be easily distinguished from the free BSA. Furthermore, the BSA/Fab pulses can be easily distinguished from the pulses obtained for the free Fab and from pulses obtained for a control protein that does not bind to the Fab. Finally, we also show that the current-pulse signature for the BSA/Fab complex can provide information about the size and stoichiometry of the complex. Introduction
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Sexton07 - Subscriber access provided by ARIZONA STATE UNIV LIBRARIES Article Resistive-Pulse Studies of Proteins and Protein/Antibody Complexes

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