Reaction Paper#2

Reaction Paper#2 - Reaction Paper# 2: Model of Helping 1...

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Reaction Paper# 2: Model of Helping Model of Helping: An analysis of behavioral challenges of residence with Alzheimer's Psychology 198G Reaction Paper #2 Dr. Hammond April 12, 2010 1
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Reaction Paper# 2: Model of Helping Model of Helping: An analysis of behavioral challenges of residence with Alzheimer's Alzheimer’s disease is a neurodegenerative brain disease that commonly results in a dementia. People with disease often exhibit behaviors that are frustrating, embarrassing, and sometimes even dangerous to the caregiver and others. The confusion and disorientation of mid- stage Alzheimer’s bring increasing difficulty with maintaining normal behaviors. Thus, resulting inappropriate behavior in social situations or getting lost in one’s own house. Alzheimer’s patients can become a danger to themselves or others. Alzheimer’s patients may have a wide variety of behavioral problems including wandering; rummaging through or hiding things; aggressiveness; hallucinations or paranoia; and sleeping and eating problems. While most behavior problems pose challenges for the person trying to provide care, management of behavior problems is obtained by implementing problem-solving skills provide a great tool. As a recent activities intern at Air Force Village West, I assist in implementing psycho- social stimulation for residents with Alzheimer’s. This means providing the highest of quality of activities that would assist in maintaining the residents’ independents, thus allowing them to do the activities with little or no help if possible. On my first day of internship, I noticed that although the residents had wide range of disabilities along with different stages of Alzheimer’s disease such as hearing loss, vision loss, difficulties in cognitive abilities and speech impediment, nevertheless stimulation and independence was still encouraged by the activities coordinator. For example, i t is fairly common for Alzheimer's patients to retain some long-term memories familiar to them, compared with their impaired
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This note was uploaded on 08/16/2010 for the course PSYC 198G taught by Professor Hummel during the Spring '10 term at UCSD.

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Reaction Paper#2 - Reaction Paper# 2: Model of Helping 1...

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