FinalExam2009

FinalExam2009 - Latest revision: 3/11/09, 2:15 PM Name...

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Latest revision: 3/11/09, 2:15 PM Name STUDENT ID Number FINAL EXAM BIEB 166, Animal Behavior & Communication Winter Quarter, 2009 This exam should consist of X pages (including this top page); please check that your exam is complete. Sign your initials in the space provided on each page . Please write your answers only in the spaces provided on each page. The exam has a total of X points; allot time to each question based upon its point value, and budget your time carefully. (You might want to leave a little time at the end for checking over your answers). PLEASE USE A PEN . ONLY EXAMS WRITTEN IN PEN CAN BE SUBMITTED FOR REGRADE REQUESTS! Good luck!
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BIEB 166: Animal Communication & Behavior Initials:____________________________ Final Exam Page 2 of 10 total student points on this page:______ 1) (6 pts) We learned about a study in toads in which scientists identified the feature detector in toads. They presented three different types of stimuli to the toad, an elongated horizontal object, an elongated vertical object, and a square object. How did the scientists identify the neurons responsible for responding to these objects? 2) (6 pts) In the frog evoked vocal response, males would respond to the singing of other males. Two neural cell types were identified in one species, simple cells and complex cells. What do these cells respond to and why does this allow the frog to recognize a species-specific male call? a. Simple cells respond to: b. Complex cells respond to: c. This allows the frog to recognize a species-specific call because: Together, the cells will only respond to calls with high frequencies and low frequencies with no middle frequencies. 3) (6 pts) There are several examples of animal creativity and artistry. In examples such as the elephant “art”, critics have pointed out that animals may simply be exhibiting operant conditioning and not actually be engaged in making art for the sake of pure creativity. If the critics are correct, how would elephants learn to paint on paper via operant conditioning? Please begin your answer by defining operant conditioning. Operant conditioning is learning occurs when unconditioned behavior is associated with a reward through reinforcement. In the case of elephant painting, operant conditioning could occur if elephants manipulate the paint brushes by random and are then rewarded by attention or food from the trainers. Over time, they would then learn to paint in order to gain this attention or food. ( For grading this question, it is most important to have a correct definition of operant conditioning and to then have some reasonable explanation of some type of reward that the elephants are receiving as a result of their painting.)
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BIEB 166: Animal Communication & Behavior Initials:____________________________ Final Exam Page 3 of 10 total student points on this page:______ 4) Environmental changes can trigger hormone production that can in turn have major life cycle effects. a. (4 pts) Please give one example of visual stimuli that can affect
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This note was uploaded on 08/19/2010 for the course BIEB BIEB 166 taught by Professor Nieh during the Winter '06 term at UCSD.

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FinalExam2009 - Latest revision: 3/11/09, 2:15 PM Name...

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