STUDY GUIDE FOR TEST 2 - STUDY GUIDE FOR TEST 2...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–3. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
STUDY GUIDE FOR TEST 2 Introduction to Philosophy Jeff Strayer 1. Locke and empiricism. What is empiricism? What are the laws of thought? What are the three different ways of stating them? Are they really laws of thought, that is laws of psychology, or laws of logic? Why? What do they mean? From which major figure in the history of philosophy do the laws of thought come? Are they thought to be necessary or contingent? What does it mean for something to be necessary or contingent? Are the laws of thought usually thought to apply just to our universe, or to any conceivable reality? Does Locke think that the laws of thought are universally understood? What does he think that this shows? Define a priori and a posteriori knowledge. What do these two terms concern? If we can only know that something is true or false on the basis of experience alone then that knowledge is said to be ____________. If we can know that something is true or false without having to consult experience in each case, but can understand the truth or falsity of a statement by understanding the meaning of the terms involved in the statement, then that knowledge is said to be ____________.
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
An ____________ proposition can be known to be true or false only by reference to how, as an matter of contingent fact, things have been, are, or will be. An ____________ proposition is one which can be known to be true or false without reference to experience, except in so far as experience is necessary for understanding its terms. Truths of reason such as logic and mathematics are thought by most philosophers to be ____________ and necessary or contingent (choose one), and truths of fact, or empirical truths, are normally said to be ____________ and necessary or contingent (choose one). Give an example of something which is necessary. Give an example of something which is contingent. Can there be necessary relations between statements which concern contingent matters of fact? If so, give an example. Is it contingent or necessary that some things are round? That the earth is round? That the
Background image of page 2
Image of page 3
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 08/21/2010 for the course PHIL 101 taught by Professor No during the Spring '10 term at Indiana University-Purdue University Fort Wayne.

Page1 / 7

STUDY GUIDE FOR TEST 2 - STUDY GUIDE FOR TEST 2...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 3. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online