Lecture 10 - First New Deal-refers to the programs passed...

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Unformatted text preview: First New Deal-refers to the programs passed between March and June of 1933  Critics of the First New Deal- from the right (corporate interests) and the left (liberals, progressives, sots, workers, the unemployed)  President Roosevelt responds with the Second New Deal (1935) Revenue Act of 1935 (Soak the Rich Tax)  Public Utility Holding Company Act  National Labor Relations Act (Wagner Act) and the National Labor Relations Board - supports workers rights to unionize and bargain with their employer A group of more militant workers break away from the AFL and form the Congress of Industrial Organizations (CIO) in 1935, a rival national labor federation  CIO and its union affiliates organize workers in mass production industries (auto, rubber, steel), including immigrants, African Americans, women and unskilled workers, and use more militant action Federally-sponsored social insurance for the elderly, unemployed, disabled and dependent children  Pension plan and unemployment insurance funded by payroll taxes on workers and employers  Established the crucial principle of federal responsibility for Americas most vulnerable citizens White Southerners  Western and Southern farmers  Workers and the unemployed  Urban voters (including many immigrants)  Traditional progressives and liberals  African Americans FDR does not support an anti-lynching bill  Some New Deal policies codify racial inequities  FDR compromises to maintain the white Souths support for his economic program The Democrats broad coalition ensures FDR a huge victory in 1936  The Republican Party was increasingly becoming the party of big business and small towns Still worried about maintaining balanced budgets, in 1937, Roosevelt cuts funding for government programs (WPA, farm programs)  Produces a steep recession  Roosevelt passes emergency spending bills in the spring of 1938, reversing the funding cuts British economist John Maynard Keynes...
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This note was uploaded on 08/21/2010 for the course HST HST 210 taught by Professor Dr.jennycarson during the Winter '10 term at Ryerson.

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Lecture 10 - First New Deal-refers to the programs passed...

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