spain2 - D eafCulture& Educationin Spain...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–7. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Education in  Spain Megan Huneck, Emily Repp,  Jillian Harper & Kat Smith
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
History of Deaf Education The tradition of Deaf education in Spain dates  back to the 16 th  century Only those deaf people who belonged to  privileged families could benefit from instruction Spain was relatively slow to develop public  schools for deaf students, and even when  schools were founded, they often closed in the  beginning years
Background image of page 2
History of Deaf Education In 1800, the first residential schools for deaf  individuals in Spain opened in Madrid and  Barcelona In 1857 a law was passed called the Moyano  Law (named after the education minister) which  recognized the need to: include subjects related to the teaching of deaf-mute  students in their teachers’ curriculum create specific schools for these individuals
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
History of Deaf Education When the Moyano Law was passed in 1857,  there were just 2 deaf schools in all of Spain:  the National School in Madrid the municipal school in Barcelona compared to: 115 such schools in Germany 110 in France 40 in England 25 in the United States  20 in Belgium
Background image of page 4
History of Deaf Education The most well known school is the  Spanish National  Deaf School once called the Royal School for Deaf-Mutes and the  Barcelona Deaf-Mute Institute. opened in 1805. residential school where those who were Deaf could  be in the Culture and could learn more about it. Instead of basing its instruction in the Spanish tradition  of oral articulation, the Royal School eventually  embraced a French model of instruction that was based  not on speech but on the methodical signs of the  Frenchman Abbé l’Epée.
Background image of page 5

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
History of Deaf Education The Congress of Milan, held in 1880, directed in this monolingual  (oral) approach. Oral language thus became the sole method for  teaching in the Deaf schools The method of oralism was used in early schooling because of  the belief that being Deaf was having a disease and needed to 
Background image of page 6
Image of page 7
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Page1 / 20

spain2 - D eafCulture& Educationin Spain...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 7. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online