IntroAndOne[1]

IntroAndOne[1] - CONTENTS Introduction 1 Subtitles 5 1....

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Unformatted text preview: CONTENTS Introduction 1 Subtitles 5 1. Wikinomics 7 2. The Perfect Storm 34 3. The Peer Pioneers 65 4. Ideagoras 97 5. The Prosumers 124 6. The New Alexandrians 151 7. Platforms for Participation 183 8. The Global Plant Floor 213 9. The Wiki Workplace 239 10. Collaborative Minds 268 11. The Wikinomics Playbook 291 Acknowledgments 293 Notes 297 Index 000 31201_ch00.i-xii.qxd 9/14/06 12:14 PM Page ix INTRODUCTION T hroughout history corporations have organized themselves according to strict hierarchical lines of authority. Everyone was a subordinate to someone else—employees versus managers, marketers versus customers, producers versus supply chain subcontractors, companies versus the com- munity. There was always someone or some company in charge, controlling things, at the “top” of the food chain. While hierarchies are not vanishing, profound changes in the nature of technology, demographics, and the global economy are giving rise to powerful new models of production based on community, collaboration, and self-organization rather than on hierarchy and control. Millions of media buffs now use blogs, wikis, chat rooms, and personal broadcasting to add their voices to a vociferous stream of dialogue and de- bate called the “blogosphere.” Employees drive performance by collabo- rating with peers across organizational boundaries, creating what we call a “wiki workplace.” Customers become “prosumers” by cocreating goods and services rather than simply consuming the end product. So-called sup- ply chains work more effectively when the risk, reward, and capability to complete major projects—including massively complex products like cars, motorcycles, and airplanes—are distributed across planetary networks of partners who work as peers. Smart companies are encouraging, rather than fighting, the heaving growth of massive online communities—many of which emerged from the fringes of the Web to attract tens of millions of participants overnight. Even ardent competitors are collaborating on path-breaking science initia- tives that accelerate discovery in their industries. Indeed, as a growing number of firms see the benefits of mass collaboration, this new of way 31201_ch01.1-314.qxd 9/14/06 12:16 PM Page 1 organizing will eventually displace the traditional corporate structures as the economy’s primary engine of wealth creation. Already this new economic model extends beyond software, music, publishing, pharmaceuticals, and other bellwethers to virtually every part of the global economy. But as this process unravels, many managers have concluded that the new mass collaboration is far from benign. Some critics look at successful “open source” projects such as Linux and Wikipedia, for example, and assume they are an attack on the legitimate right and need of companies to make a profit. Others see this new cornucopia of participa- tion in the economy as a threat to their very existence (has anyone bought a music CD lately?)....
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This note was uploaded on 08/22/2010 for the course ING 8744444 taught by Professor Drphen during the Spring '10 term at Rochester.

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IntroAndOne[1] - CONTENTS Introduction 1 Subtitles 5 1....

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