Lectures 10 - 12 PowerPoint - Newton's Laws

Lectures 10 - 12 PowerPoint - Newton's Laws -...

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    The Laws of Motion Chapter 5
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    Force and Motion This is an EXTREMELY important chapter! What makes objects move?? How do they move?? How do we quantify our everyday observations??
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    Sir Isaac Newton  1643 - 1727  One of the two “inventors” of  Calculus The Law of Gravitation Optics (corpuscular) Laws of Motion (N1, N2, N3) Apple story not substantiated  Was generally a mean guy
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    Force Force  is the fundamental concept being  introduced in this chapter. We have an intuitive understanding of  what a  FORCE  is … a push or a pull. We will discuss the physical changes that  are induced when we apply a  FORCE  to  an object.
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    Force Forces are what cause any change in the  velocity of an object A force is that which causes an acceleration The  net force  is the vector sum of all the  forces acting on an object Also called total force, resultant force, or  unbalanced force The net force on an object can be ZERO
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    Newton’s First Law (N1) An object is in EQULIBRIUM when the  sum of all of the forces acting on it is zero. An object in EQUILIBRIUM will either be  (and remain) at rest (no motion), or Will move with CONSTANT VELOCITY
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    Newton’s Second Law (N2) What if the net force is not ZERO?   Newton’s SECOND LAW  If there is a non-zero (unbalanced) force  applied to an object, it will accelerate. The acceleration is proportional to the force but  is different for every object. The proportionality constant is “m” and is called  the mass. The mass of an object is a measure of the total  “amount of matter” contained by the object.
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    Newton’s Second Law
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    Mass Mass is an inherent property of an object Mass is independent of the object’s  surroundings Mass is independent of the method used  to measure it Mass is a scalar quantity The SI unit of mass is kg
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    Unit of Force The SI unit of force is the  newton 1 N of force acting on a 1 kg mass  produces an acceleration of 1 m/s 2 1 N ≡ 1κγ ⋅ μ / σ 2
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    a F a F m m object the on acting Forces all j = = - - - Newton’s Second Law Even better….
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    CPS Question
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    The tendency of an object to resist any  attempt to change its velocity is called  inertia Mass  is that property of an object that  specifies how much resistance an object  exhibits to changes in its velocity Inertia and Mass
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    Zero Net Force When the net force is equal to zero: The acceleration is equal to zero The velocity is constant Equilibrium  occurs when the net force is 
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Lectures 10 - 12 PowerPoint - Newton's Laws -...

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