PHY 2048L - one dimensional motion

PHY 2048L - one dimensional motion - Results 3.3.3 3.4.1...

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One-Dimensional Motion I Carson Slabaugh James Simpson Cassandra Scott Robertson Augustine June 5, 2006
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Abstract: The purpose of this lab is to see the relationships between Position, Velocity, and Acceleration graphs over a period of time. This experiment will help to visualize these three curves for different types of motion in one dimension. Introduction: Kinematics is the study of motion using mathematical equations and graphs. This lab is to study the motion of a particle (a person or a small cart) in a straight-line. To do so, an ultrasonic sensor is used in conjunction with a microcomputer, an electronic interface, and a specialized graphing program to precisely record the data and display it graphically. Apparatus: To perform this experiment, the following supplies are needed: Laboratory system that includes an ultrasonic sensor, a microcomputer, an electronic interface, and a PC with software installed to analyze the data obtained; a track and a cart with low friction rollers. The materials above are to be setup in the following manner.
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Unformatted text preview: Results: 3.3.3 3.4.1 3.4.3 3.5.1 3.5.2 Conclusion: In this experiment, the kinematics of one-dimensional motion was studied to find the relationships between position, velocity, and acceleration graphs as a function of time for different types of motion. It was found that our predictions were, in most cases, consistent with the collected data. The greatest differences were the resultant of the fact that the theoretical conditions used to make our predictions were simply not producable in our laboratory conditions. For example, when changing motion from a positive to a negative velocity, it is impossible to create a vertical line on the Velocity as a function of Time graph. Overall, the lab was successful in that it reinforced the Law’s of Kinematics for one-dimensional motion. Bibliography: Serway, Raymond A., and John W. Jewitt. Physics - for Scientists and Engineers . 6th ed. Vol. 1. Belmont, CA: Thomson Learning, 2004....
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This note was uploaded on 08/22/2010 for the course PHY 2048 taught by Professor Bose during the Summer '08 term at University of Central Florida.

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PHY 2048L - one dimensional motion - Results 3.3.3 3.4.1...

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