Comm 1310 Notes Chapters 11-15

Comm 1310 Notes Chapters 11-15 - 1 Chapter 11 I AUDIENCE...

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Chapter 11 I. AUDIENCE CENTERED MODEL OF THE PRESENTATIONAL SPEAKING PROCESS A. Eight steps of the model 1. Select and narrow topic 2. Identify Purpose 3. Develop Central Idea 4. Generate Main Idea 5. Gather Supporting Material 6. Organize Presentation 7. Rehearse Presentation 8. Deliver Presentation B. Audience Centered Presentational Speaker 1. Someone who considers and adapts to the audience at every stage of the presentational speaking process II. SPEAKER ANXIETY Stage fright, anxiety about speaking in public that is manifested in physiological symptoms such as rapid heartbeat, butterflies in the stomach, shaking knees and hands, quivering voice, and increased perspiration. C. Illusion of transparency The mistaken belief that the physical manifestations of a speaker’s nervousness are apparent to the audience. 1
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III. MANAGING SPEAKER ANXIETY D. Know how to develop a presentation E. Be prepared 1. logical and clear outline 2. select appropriate topic 3. research topic 4. rehearse F. Focus on your audience 1. consider goals, needs interests of your audience G. Focus on your message 1. Habituation a) The process of becoming more comfortable as you speak H. Give yourself a mental prep talk I. Use deep-breathing techniques 1. slowly inhale and exhale 2. relax entire body J. Take advantage opportunities to speak K. Seek professional help 1. systematic desensitization an anxiety management strategy that includes general relaxation techniques and visualization of success. 2. Performance visualization An anxiety management strategy that involves viewing a videotape of a successful presentation and imagining oneself delivering that presentation. IV. SELECTING AND NARROWING YOUR TOPIC L. Consider the audience, the occasion, and your interests and experience M. Practice silent brainstorming N. Scan web directories and web pages O. Listen and read topic ideas P. Narrow your topic by generating increasingly specific categories and subcategories 2
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Q. General Purpose 1. To Inform a) To define, describe or explain a thing, person, place, concept or process 2. To persuade a) To change or reinforce audience members’ ideas or convictions, or urge them to do something 3. To Entertain a) To amuse an audience R. Specific Purpose 1. Specifies what you want audience members to be able to do by the end of your presentation. 2. Guides you in developing your presentation 3. Uses the words “ at the end of my presentation the audience will” VI. CENTRAL IDEA OF THE SPEECH S. Central Idea Central Idea makes a definitive point about the topic. It focuses on the topic of the speech. T. Central Idea should 1. be audience centered 2. reflect a single topic 3. be a complete declarative sentence 4. use direct, specific language U. Generating Main Ideas 1. Does the central idea have logical divisions? 2. Can I think of several reasons the central idea is true?
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This note was uploaded on 08/23/2010 for the course COMM 1310 taught by Professor Mottet during the Spring '08 term at Texas State.

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Comm 1310 Notes Chapters 11-15 - 1 Chapter 11 I AUDIENCE...

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