Flash Cards

Flash Cards - Venus of Willendorf, from Willendorf,...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–4. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Venus of Willendorf, from Willendorf, Austria, c.25000-21000 B.C. Limestone 4 3/8 inch.(11.5 cm) high. Naturhistorisches Museum, Vienna Paleolithic sculpture Monumental object with a sense of organic form The rhythmic arrangement of bulbous oval shapes emphasize the head, breasts, torso, and thighs. Large elements in relation to the whole Facial features, neck, and lower legs virtually eliminated Arms, resting on the breasts, undeveloped, hardly noticeable Emphasizing parts of the body related to reproduction and nursing. Sculpture in the round Comparison of the front with the side and back shows more attention lavished in the front. Frontality is characteristic of much religious art in later cultures, the combination of frontality and symbolic exaggeration represented a fertility goddess. Red pigment associated with childbirth. Cultural preoccupation with fertility, on which the survival of the species depended.
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Hall of Running Bulls, Lascaux, Dordogne, France, c.15000-13000 B.C. Paint on limestone rock, individual bulls 13-16 ft. (3.96-4.88 m) long. Note that the white bulls are superimposed over other animals. Cave artists did not always cover up previous representations before adding new ones. A reflection of the importance of hunting. Animals depicted do not coincide with those most hunted, suggesting that these images had other meanings as well. Painted with earth-colored pigments-brown, black, yellow, and red. pigments from ocher, hematite, and manganese and applied to the natural white limestone surfaces of the walls. Drawing an outline and filling it with pigment. Stored in hollow bones plugged at one end, bones used to blow the pigment onto the walls. Capture the essence of certain species by slightly exaggerating characteristic features. Diagonal planes impress they are going uphill.
Background image of page 2
Group of statue from the Abu Temple at Tell Asmar,c. 2700-2500 B.C. Limestone, alabaster, and gypsum, tallest figure approx. 30 in.(76.3 cm) high.Iraq Museum, Baghdad, and Oriental Institute, University of Chicago. Early Dynastic Period. Tell Asmar: a Sumerian site about 50 miles northeast of modern Baghdad, in Iraq. Not known whether originally a unified group, but most hold a cup. Men tend to wear less above the waist than women (in this case, the bare-chested men wear skirts, and the women wear robes over one shoulder). Pale stone with their features emphasized in black pitch. Eyes are shells, pupils are inlaid with black limestone. The largest thought to represent an important person dedicating himself to the god Abu. All represent worshipers of varying status, the size was decide by the amount of money its donor paid for it. Rendered with so-call hierarchical proportions, a convention equating size with status. Cylindrical, reflecting the Mesopotamian preference of rounded sculpture shapes.
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 4
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 08/24/2010 for the course TRAD 104 taught by Professor Freeble during the Fall '08 term at Arizona.

Page1 / 16

Flash Cards - Venus of Willendorf, from Willendorf,...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 4. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online