Menu Labeling in Chain Restaurants

Menu Labeling in Chain Restaurants - Menu Labeling in Chain...

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RUDD REPORT RUDD CENTER FOR FOOD POLICY & OBESITY YALE UNIVERSITY 309 Edwards Street, New Haven, CT 06520-8369 203 432 6700 fax 203 432 9674 rudd.center@yale.edu www.yaleruddcenter.org 2008 Menu Labeling in Chain Restaurant s Opportunities for Public Policy
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MENU LABELING: OPPORTUNITIES FOR PUBLIC POLICY I NTRODUCTION Eating out is no longer an occasional indulgence. Americans spend almost half their food dollars on foods made outside the home. Fast- food chains are particularly popular because they are convenient and relatively inexpensive and their menus appeal to a wide cross-section of the population. Americans now consume about a third of their calories from fast-food restaurants and food service vendors. This upward trend is coincident with rising rates of diabetes, heart disease, and obesity. Most people are unaware of the number of calories or the amount of fat, sodium, or sugar in a typical fast-food meal. Putting nutrition informa- tion on menus and menu boards has been proposed to make it more available to consumers. Proponents say consumers deserve to be fully informed about the products they buy—from clothing to cleaning sup- plies, to food. Many restaurant chains already have this information, but they often display it on websites or posters that may not be readily accessible when consumers are deciding what to eat. Menu labeling policies would give people the information at the time of purchase. Such policies have been passed in several major cities; they have been proposed federally and in several states as well. This Rudd Report presents information to assist policymakers and interested citizens in determining whether menu labeling is a viable alternative for their constituents and communities. It provides a stand- alone fact sheet, and gives an example of calorie information with a menu labeling policy, public opinion polling data, arguments for and against a policy, and a compilation of relevant scientific studies. Inside this report: Menu Labeling Fact Sheet 3 Examples of Calorie Information on Menu Boards 4 Opinion Polls 5 Arguments for and against Menu Labeling 6 Scientific Studies Related to Menu Labeling 8 References for Scientific Studies 10 The Rudd Center for Food Policy and Obesity at Yale University is directed by Kelly D. Brownell, PhD, and seeks to improve the world’s diet, prevent obesity, and reduce weight stigma by establishing creative con- nections between science and public policy. Jennifer Pomeranz, JD, MPH , is the Director of Legal Initiatives at the Rudd Center and is available for sup- port. jennifer.pomeranz@yale.edu This brief was prepared by Roberta R. Friedman, ScM Director of Public Policy roberta.friedman@yale.edu (203) 432-4717 2
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M ENU LABELING F ACT S HEET WHAT IS MENU LABELING? Menu labeling places nutrition information such as calories,
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This note was uploaded on 08/24/2010 for the course PSYC 123 taught by Professor Kellybrownell during the Spring '08 term at Yale.

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Menu Labeling in Chain Restaurants - Menu Labeling in Chain...

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