Nutrition Standards for Foods in Schools Leading

Nutrition Standards for Foods in Schools Leading -...

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Unformatted text preview: Nutrition Standards for Foods in Schools: Leading the Way Toward Healthier Youth (Free Executive Summary) http://www.nap.edu/catalog/11899.html Free Executive Summary ISBN: 978-0-309-10383-1, 296 pages, 6 x 9, hardback (2007) This executive summary plus thousands more available at www.nap.edu. Nutrition Standards for Foods in Schools: Leading the Way Toward Healthier Youth Committee on Nutrition Standards for Foods in Schools, Virginia A. Stallings and Ann L. Yaktine, editors This free executive summary is provided by the National Academies as part of our mission to educate the world on issues of science, engineering, and health. If you are interested in reading the full book, please visit us online at http://www.nap.edu/catalog/11899.html . You may browse and search the full, authoritative version for free; you may also purchase a print or electronic version of the book. If you have questions or just want more information about the books published by the National Academies Press, please contact our customer service department toll-free at 888-624-8373. Food choices and eating habits are learned from many sources. The school environment plays a significant role in teaching and modeling health behaviors. For some children, foods consumed at school can provide a major portion of their daily nutrient intake. Foods and beverages consumed at school can come from two major sources: (1) Federally funded programs that include the National School Lunch Program (NSLP), the School Breakfast Program (SBP), and after-school snacks and (2) competitive sources that include vending machines, &#34a la carte&#34 sales in the school cafeteria, or school stores and snack bars. Foods and beverages sold at school outside of the federally reimbursable school nutrition programs are referred to as competitive foods because they compete with the traditional school lunch as a nutrition source. There are important concerns about the contribution of nutrients and total calories from competitive foods to the daily diets of school-age children and adolescents. Nutrition Standards for Foods in Schools offers both reviews and recommendations about appropriate nutrition standards and guidance for the sale, content, and consumption of foods and beverages at school, with attention given to foods and beverages offered in competition with federally reimbursable meals and snacks. It is sure to be an invaluable resource to parents, federal and state government agencies, educators and schools, health care professionals, food manufacturers, industry trade groups, media, and those involved in consumer advocacy. Copyright 2007 National Academy of Sciences. All rights reserved. Unless otherwise indicated, all materials in this PDF file are copyrighted by the National Academy of Sciences. Distribution or copying is strictly prohibited without permission of the National Academies Press http://www.nap.edu/permissions/ Permission is granted for this material to be posted on a secure password-protected Web site. The content may not be posted on a public Web site. Copyright...
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