exam2v1ans - 0001-1 Exam II - Physics 1240 Spring, 2010...

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0001-1 Exam II - Physics 1240 – Spring, 2010 – version 1 1. Suppose you pluck a guitar string and listen to the sound produced, then put your finger down halfway along the string and pluck it again. What happens to the sound produced? A) The period is halved. B) The frequency is doubled. C) The pitch increases by one octave. D) Both A and B. E) A, B, and C. 2. What is the frequency of the note which is three octaves above 100 Hz? A) 103 Hz B) 200 Hz C) 400 Hz D) 600 Hz E) 800 Hz 3. A sound intensity level (SIL) of 80 dB corresponds to what sound intensity, in W/m 2 ? A) 10 -8 W/m 2 B) 10 -6 W/m 2 C) 10 -4 W/m 2 D) 10 -2 W/m 2 E) 10 4 W/m 2 4. What is a key difference between a flute and a recorder? A) One of them makes use of an edgetone and the other does not. B) One of them has a double reed and one has a single reed. C) One of them has a reed and the other does not. D) Something else. 5. One trumpet produces a sound 10 dB louder than one flute. How many flutes would have to play together to produce the same sound intensity as the trumpet? A) 2 B) 3 C) 7 D) 10 E) 20 6. Professor Betterton is playing music in the area behind the lecture hall. The door is wide open. It is an ordinary (human sized) door – the real door in our lecture hall! Assume all the walls absorb sound very strongly, so that echoes off the walls can be neglected (perhaps we covered all surfaces with specially designed, strongly sound-absorbing carpets). Which pitches of sound can be heard by people in the room who are not in front of the door? That is, which sounds will be heard in all parts of the room, because they spread out from the door? A) Predominantly low pitches will spread out and be heard by the listener. B) Predominantly high pitches will spread out and be heard by the listener. C) All audible pitches will spread out and be heard by the listener, the frequency makes no difference. D) No audible pitches will spread out and be heard by the listener, the frequency makes no difference. Absorbing walls walls speaker listener Open door ?
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0001-2 7. Suppose there are two tones playing simultaneously from two stationary instruments. The first tone is a steady 440 Hz, yet you hear beats once every 2 seconds. What can you conclude must be true about the second tone? A) The second tone must be either louder or softer, but we can't easily tell which. B) The second tone must be 0.5 Hz higher. C) The second tone must be 2 Hz lower. D) The second tone must be 2 Hz different, but could be higher or lower, we can't easily tell which. E) The second tone must be 0.5 Hz different, but could be higher or lower, we can't easily tell which. 8. If you turn up the dial on your stereo from 30 dB to 60 dB, what happens to the intensity of sound coming from the speakers into your room, as measured in Watt/m 2 ? (Assume ideal conditions, with no echoes or losses.) A) It increases by a factor of 10,000. B)
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This note was uploaded on 08/24/2010 for the course PHYS 1240 taught by Professor Holland,murray during the Spring '08 term at Colorado.

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exam2v1ans - 0001-1 Exam II - Physics 1240 Spring, 2010...

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