J. Ann Tickner, “Critique of Morgenthau”

J. Ann Tickner, “Critique of Morgenthau”

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J. Ann Tickner, “Critique of Morgenthau” There are doubts from the male side which usually dominates states, whether a woman would be strong enough to press the nuclear button, suggesting that there may be an even more fundamental barrier to women’s entry into the highest ranks of the military or of policy making. Why international politics is perceived as a men’s world and why women remain so underrepresented in the discipline of international relations? Women take part in military now, but still, when it comes to nuclear power and positions (e.g. foreign policy) which leadership is needed men are seen more suitable for the job. A Masculine Perspective? The need for control has been an important motivating force of modern realism. Morgenthau is aware that real men, as real states, are both moral and bestial but, because states do not live up to the universal moral laws that govern the universe, those who behave morally in international politics are doomed to failure because of the immoral actions of others. It is a Hobbesian world; states may act like beasts, for survival depends on a maximization of power and willingness to fight. Morgenthau’s universalistic morality postulates the highest form of morality as an abstract ideal, to which the states seldom adhere: the morality of states, by contrast, as an instrumental morality guided by self- interest. Also, If men is dominating the whole political scene, Tickner is stressing the possibility that people are only considering the masculine perspective on theories and solutions. She believes this not only leads to discrimination against women, but also to the elimination of significant feminist point of views. To proof that this is the case, she goes on to examine the Six Principles of Political Realism written by Morgenthau. Summary of the Six Principle: 1) Politics, like sovereignty as general, is governed by objective laws that have their roots in human nature, which is unchanging: therefore it is possible to develop a rational theory that reflects these objective laws. 2)
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J. Ann Tickner, “Critique of Morgenthau”

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