Prbset04

Prbset04 - one object continues to decrease, and that of...

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CHEMICAL ENGINEERING THERMODYNAMICS COURSE NO.: CHEG301 STUDENT: ___________________ COURSE: Thermodynamics INSTRUCTOR: Prof. Anderson SUBJECT: Problem Set 04 DUE: Wednesday, Sept. 19, 2007 1. Steam at 500 psia and 600 ° F enters a throttling valve that reduces the steam pressure to 100 psia. Assuming there is no heat loss from the valve, what is the exit temperature of the steam and its change in entropy? If air (assumed to be an ideal gas with C P = 7 Btu/lbmol- ° F) entered the valve at 500 psia and 600 ° F and left at 100 psia, what would be its exit temperature and entropy change? 2. Initially, two identical objects of constant specific heat are maintained at the same temperature. These two objects are then used as reservoirs for a refrigerator. Heat is removed from one object and rejected to the other object. As a result, the temperature of
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Unformatted text preview: one object continues to decrease, and that of the other continually increases. It is assumed that neither object undergoes a phase change nor a change in volume. Derive an expression which gives the minimum work required to decrease the temperature of the colder object to some final temperature, T fc , which is less than the initial temperature of both objects, T i . 3. If the temperature of the atmosphere is 5 ° C on a winter day and if 1 kg of water at 90 ° C is available, how much work can be obtained? Assume that the volume of the water is constant, and assume that the specific heat at constant volume is 18 cal/gmol-K and is independent of temperature. 4. Express the following in terms of C P , P, V, T, and derivatives of these variables: a) ( ∂ U / ∂ V ) T b) ( ∂ T / ∂ P ) H...
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This note was uploaded on 08/26/2010 for the course CHEG 301 taught by Professor Anderson during the Fall '07 term at UConn.

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