AP'89MultipleChoice

AP'89MultipleChoice - 1989 Advanced Placement Exam Part I...

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1989 Advanced Placement Exam Part I Multiple Choice Note: For all questions referring to solutions, assume that the solvent is water unless otherwise stated. Directions: Each set of lettered choices below refers to the numbered statements immediately following it. Select the one lettered choice that best fits each statement and then blacken the corresponding space on the answer sheet. A choice may be used once, more than once, or not at all in each set. Questions 1–3 a. O c. Rb e. N b. La d. Mg 1. What is the most electronegative element? 2. Which element exhibits the greatest number of different oxidation states? 3. Which of the elements above has the smallest ionic radius for its most commonly found ion? Questions 4–7 a. 1 s 2 2 s 2 2 p 5 3 s 2 3 p 5 b. 1 s 2 2 s 2 2 p 6 3 s 2 3 p 6 c. 1 s 2 2 s 2 2 p 6 2 d 10 3 s 2 3 p 6 d. 1 s 2 2 s 2 2 p 6 3s 2 3 p 6 3 d 5 e. 1 s 2 2 s 2 2 p 6 3 s 2 3 p 6 3 d 3 4 s 2 4. An impossible electronic configuration 5. The ground–state configuration for the atoms of a transition element 6. The ground–state configuration of a negative ion of a halogen 7. The ground–state configuration of a common ion of an alkaline earth element Questions 8–10 a. a solution with a pH less than 7 that is not a buffer solution b. a buffer solution with a pH between 4 and 7 c. a buffer solution with a pH between 7 and 10 d. a solution with a pH greater than 7 that is not a buffer solution e. a solution with a pH of 7 (Ionization constants: CH 3 COOH = 1.8 10 –5 ; NH 3 = 1.8 10 –5 ; H 2 CO 3 : K 1 = 4 10 –7 ; K 2 = 4 10 –11 ;) 8. A solution prepared to be initially 1 M in NaCl and 1 M in HCl. 9. A solution prepared to be initially 1 M in Na 2 CO 3 and 1 M in CH 3 COONa 10. A solution prepared to be initially 0.5 M in CH 3 COOH and 1 M in CH 3 COONa Questions 11–14 a. hydrogen bonding b. hybridization c. ionic bonding d. resonance e. van der Waals forces (London dispersion forces) 11. Is used to explain why iodine molecules are held together in the solid state 12. Is used to explain why the boiling point of HF is greater than the boiling point of HBr 13. Is used to explain the fact that the four bonds in methane are equivalent 14. Is used to explain the fact that the carbon-to- carbon bonds in benzene, C 6 H 6 , are identical Copyright © 1989 by Educational Testing Service, Princeton, NJ 08541. All rights reserved. Reproductions of these examination questions by classroom teachers is permitted for face-to-face teaching purposes only. 1
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Directions: Each of the questions or incomplete statements below is followed by five suggested answers or compilations. Select the one that is best in each case and then blacken the corresponding space on the answer sheet. 15. The weight of H
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AP'89MultipleChoice - 1989 Advanced Placement Exam Part I...

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