Midterm for ENGL146 (1).pdf - 1 Midterm for ENGL146 Seeing the Present(Spring 2020 Read these directions carefully This is an open-book take-home exam

Midterm for ENGL146 (1).pdf - 1 Midterm for ENGL146 Seeing...

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Unformatted text preview: 1 Midterm for ENGL146: Seeing the Present (Spring 2020) Read these directions carefully. This is an open-book take-home exam. You have 50 MINUTES to answer these questions. Submit your answers as a DOC, DOCX, RTF, or PDF file to ELMS (in the Midterm assignment). Complete: ● THREE Identifications (total of 50%) ● TWO Short Essay Questions (total of 50%) 2 SECTION 1 IDENTIFICATIONS (50% of exam grade) Answer THREE of these four identifications. Answer all the questions for each identification. 3 Identification A Answer all four questions about this image. 1. What is one of the common names by which this meme is known? 2. In this version of the meme, what is the relationship between “Socialism,” “The Youth,” and “Capitalism”? 3. What is the ​general​ idea of this meme, separate from this specific example? 4. Who took the photo upon which this meme is based? Why did he or she take it? 4 Identification B Answer all four questions about this quote. 1. 2. 3. 4. Who is the speaker of this line? In what sense is this speaker an “antisocial hermit” and a “recluse” in real life? What is the opposite of “real life” in this story? How does this passage reflect the themes of the story in which it appears? 5 Identification C Answer all four questions about this image. 1. 2. 3. 4. Who is this character, and what story does he appear in? What is the ​real identity​ of this character, and what is his true mission in the story? Why do the words “Ha ha ha Clap Clap Clap” appear at the bottom of the panel? This character is singing Rick Martin’s “She Bangs.” What is the significance of his singing this particular song? 6 Identification D Answer all four questions about this image. 1. 2. 3. 4. Which book is this image/scene drawn from, and who is the book’s author? What is happening in this part of the story? Approximately what time of day does this scene take place in? What does this scene teach us about the main character of the book in which this scene appears? 7 SECTION 2: Short Essay Questions (50% of exam grade) Select TWO of these three short essay questions. Each answer should be approximately 150-300 words (half a page to one full page, double-spaced). You have broad latitude in how you interpret these essay questions. There is no one right answer, but your responses should weave together class discussions with your own insights. Short Essay Question A In Chapter 2 of ​Understanding Comics​, cartoonist Scott McCloud claims that “iconic” cartoon images (like smiley faces) are more “universal” and easy to identify with than photorealistic images. In addition to ​Understanding Comics,​ select two or three primary texts that we read before Spring Break, and discuss how their graphical styles affect their “universality”? Do your chosen texts support McCloud’s claims? Do they undermine his claims? What ideas of universality, if any, does each text propose? Make sure you define your terms, and make sure to refer to specific details of the primary texts you choose. Short Essay Question B Various thinkers have talked about the idea of “medium-specificity” and have suggested that it is important for us to think about medium-specificity when analyzing works of art. For example, literary critic N. Katherine Hayles writes that critics should “recognize that all texts are instantiated and that the nature of the medium in which they are instantiated matters.” Selecting two or three primary texts we read before Spring Break, discuss how each makes use of its specific medium to do something that only that medium can do. How do your chosen texts make use of their specific mediums of instantiation? Make sure to define your terms, and refer to specific details of your chosen primary texts. Short Essay Question C ​ In his Birth of an Industry: Blackface Minstrelsy and the Rise of American Animation,​ animation historian Nicholas Sammond argues that the birth of the animation industry is intimately connected with the racial representations of blackface minstrelsy. Selecting two or three primary texts that we read before Spring Break, discuss how different narratives approach the representation of race. How do your chosen texts represent the relation between whiteness and other racial positions? How do these texts handle the question of caricature and racial difference? As always, make sure you define your terms, and refer to specific details of your chosen primary texts. ...
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  • Spring '20
  • Scott McCloud, Minstrel show, N. Katherine Hayles

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