chinese mind - The Chinese Mind Confucianism and Taoism...

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The Chinese Mind Confucianism and Taoism
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Background: political order and disorder in early China Western Zhou: 1066-770 B.C. Feudal states in W. Zhou (1066-770 B.C.) FEUDAL RANKS King of the Zhou Gong – duke Hou – marquis Bo – earl Zi – viscount Nan – baron
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Background: political order and disorder in early China Western Zhou: 1066-770 B.C. The Well-Field System
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“Hundred Schools of Thoughts” Confucianism Taoism Mohism Legalism Background: political order and disorder in early China Eastern Zhou: Warring States 452-221 B.C.
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Kong Zi (Confucius, 9/28/551 – 479 BC) Confucianism
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A Ming-dynasty painting showing that Confucius, in his late years, wrote The Book of Songs, The Book of History, and The Spring and Autumn Annals , and taught his disciples. It is said that Confucius had 3,000 disciples Confucianism
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The thirteen stone-tablet pavilions in the Temple of Confucius were built under the order of emperors of the Jin (1115-1234), Yuan (1271-1368), and Qing dynasties to house stone tablets with accounts of reconstructions of the temple and of ceremonies honoring Confucius Confucianism
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A memorial ceremony for Confucius Confucianism
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On “Ren” (perfect virtue) Tsze-chang asked Confucius about perfect virtue. Confucius said, “To be able to practice five things everywhere under heaven constitutes perfect virtue." He begged to ask what they were, and was told, "Gravity, generosity of soul, sincerity, earnestness, and kindness . If you are grave, you will not be treated with disrespect. If you are generous, you will win all. If you are sincere, people will repose trust in you. If you are earnest, you will accomplish much. If you are kind, this will enable you to employ the services of others.” ( Analects 17.5) Confucianism
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chinese mind - The Chinese Mind Confucianism and Taoism...

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