bio 38 - BIO 311C Spring 2010 Final Exam Date: Wednesday 12...

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BIO 311C Spring 2010 Lecture 38 – Monday 3 May 1 Date: Wednesday 12 May Time: 7:00 – 10:00 p.m. Location: CMA A2.320 Final Exam
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Stages in the Life of a Virus 1. (recognition) A virus recognizes, and becomes attached to, the surface of a host cell. 2. (infection) The virus genetic content (nucleic acid) becomes incorporated into the host cell and inactivates host defense mechanisms, thereby stabilizing its genetic content within the cell. In some cases its genetic content may be further stabilized by integrating DNA into a chromosome of the host cell. 3. (synthesis) The virus genetic content dictates instructions for the cell to synthesize virus structural molecules, including its nucleic acid and proteins. 4. (assembly) The recently synthesized molecules are assembled to form new viruses. 5. (release) The new viruses, which are exactly like the virus that originally infected the host cell, are released from the cell. 4
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Bacteriophage Attached to the Surface of a Bacterial Cell Presumably these “phage” have injected, or will soon inject, their genetic material (DNA) through the envelope and into the cytoplasm of the bacterial cell. * Textbook fig. 19.1, p. 381 phage E. coli 5
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Lytic Cycle of a Typical Bacterial Virus (Bacteriophage) A virus that attacks a prokaryotic cell is called a bacteriophage, or phage for short. Textbook Fig. 19.5, p. 385 6 recognition infection and stabilization synthesis assembly release
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Synthesis of phage genetic information, head proteins, tail proteins and tail- fiber proteins utilize the replication, transcription and translation machinery of the host cell. Assembly then occurs spontaneously. Phage DNA Replication produces new phage DNA Transcription and translation of phage DNA produce new phage structural proteins From textbook Fig. 19.5, p. 385 Synthesis and Assembly of Phage within a Bacterial Cell * 7 The name bacteriophage is sometimes shortened to “phage”.
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The Lysogenic Phase in the Life of a Bacteriophage discard protein coat Portion of Fig. 19.6, p. 386 8
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A temperate phage is a bacterial virus that under most circumstances incorporates its DNA into host DNA, thereby becoming a prophage.
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This note was uploaded on 08/29/2010 for the course BIO 49720 taught by Professor Brand during the Spring '10 term at University of Texas at Austin.

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bio 38 - BIO 311C Spring 2010 Final Exam Date: Wednesday 12...

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