Web_L33_10BIO311C - BIO 311C Spring 2010 Your graded Exam 3 will be available for you to pick up at the end of todays lecture The key to Exam 3 has

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–7. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
BIO 311C Spring 2010 Lecture 33 – Wednesday 21 Apr. 1 Your graded Exam 3 will be available for you to pick up at the end of today’s lecture. The key to Exam 3 has been posted on the course web site on Wednesday (April 21). If you believe that a question on your Exam 3 was graded incorrectly or your score was calculated inaccurately, then see Rebecca before 4:00 p.m. on Monday (April 26) to explain your concern. We cannot consider changes after that time.
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Definition: Bioinformation molecule - a biopolymer whose sequence of monomers conveys useful information in the cell. The three kinds of information molecules in cells are DNA, RNA and polypeptides. Primary Structure of a portion of a strand of DNA Primary structure of a portion of a molecule of RNA Primary structure of a portion of a polypeptide chain The information content of bioinformation molecules resides in their primary structures. 3
Background image of page 2
Major roles of Bioinformation Molecules in Cells DNA RNA Protein (polypeptide chains) long-term storage of information short-term storage of information, regulation of expression of information, management and conveyance of information expression of information * 4
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Primary Structure of DNA Primary Structure of RNA Primary Structure of a polypeptide chain Information Flow in Cells transcription translation replication * This sequence of events is often called the "central dogma" of molecular biology. reverse transcription 5
Background image of page 4
Review : DNA is an essential component of all living cells. DNA resides in the cytoplasmic matrix of prokaryotic cells. Most DNA resides in nucleus of eukaryotic cells, with a small amount also in mitochondria and plastids. DNA does not move from one compartment to another in cells under normal circumstances. DNA * 6
Background image of page 5

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
DNA occurs in cells as a very long double helix of two polynucleotide chains. The double helix of DNA in eukaryotes is organized in cells by binding to, and wrapping around, specific proteins called histones. This binding and wrapping in eukaryotic cells is very elaborate and organized, producing a complex structure called chromatin. Chromatin contains approximately 50% DNA and 50% protein. chromatin packing in eukaryotic cells * Typical eukaryotic cells contain hundreds of times more DNA per cell than do typical prokaryotic cells. 7
Background image of page 6
Image of page 7
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 08/29/2010 for the course BIO 49720 taught by Professor Brand during the Spring '10 term at University of Texas at Austin.

Page1 / 20

Web_L33_10BIO311C - BIO 311C Spring 2010 Your graded Exam 3 will be available for you to pick up at the end of todays lecture The key to Exam 3 has

This preview shows document pages 1 - 7. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online