Lecture 15_100108 - In the early 20th century, several...

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Waves of Light Electromagnetic Radiation Not all radiation is equal Prisms break sunlight into spectrum of colors Colors identified by numerical value (wavelength)
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Electromagnetic Radiation
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Electromagnetic Radiation Wave traveling through space Electric field Magnetic field
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Electromagnetic Radiation Wavelength (Greek lambda, λ ) distance between corresponding points on adjacent waves Expressed in units of length: nanometers (nm) 6
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Wave Nature of Light
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Relation between υ and λ As υ (frequency) increases , λ (wavelength) decreases As υ decreases , λ increases Frequency = υ = c/ λ c= speed of light 3.00 x 10 8 meters/second or 186,000 miles/second λ and υ are inversely related
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Fig. 2.6 Electromagnetic Spectrum
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Electromagnetic Radiation
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Electromagnetic Radiation The red light in a laser pointer comes from a diode laser that has a wavelength of about 630 nm. What is the frequency of the light? c = 3.00 x 10 8 m/s –1
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Light as a Particle
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Unformatted text preview: In the early 20th century, several discoveries led to a particle model of light. Photons: particles of light Energy of a photon: E = h h = Plancks Constant= 6.626 x 10 34 J s Plancks Equation Energy, E = h = hc / E is the energy of a single photon c = 3.00 x 10 8 m/sec h, Plancks constant = 6.63 x 10-34 joule sec Joule is a unit of energy Energy is directly proportional to (frequency) and inversely proportional to (wavelength) As , , E As , , E Electromagnetic Spectrum Energy (J) The Energy and Frequency of Quanta Radiation E Photon E mol (m) (s-1 ) (J) (kJ/mol) Radio Wave 10 3.0x 10 7 2.0 x 10-26 1.2x10-5-22 30-3 21 Photon Energy A laser emits red light with wavelength of 630 nm (1 nm = 10 9 m) What is the energy of a photon at this Wavelength?...
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This note was uploaded on 08/29/2010 for the course CHM 2045 taught by Professor Brant during the Fall '08 term at University of South Florida - Tampa.

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Lecture 15_100108 - In the early 20th century, several...

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