Chapter_35_and_36_to_post

Chapter_35_and_36_to_post - Chapter 35 Plant Structure and...

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Click to edit Master subtitle style Chapter 35 Plant Structure and Growth (ch36)
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Flowering plants: 2 main groups Monocots: Eudicots: See Fig. 30.13
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Click to edit Master subtitle style Monocot ( e.g. , corn) seedlings each have 1 cotyledon (seed leaf); in monocots the cotyledon often remains within the confines of the seed
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Click to edit Master subtitle style Eudicot ( e.g. , bean) seedlings each have 2 cotyledons (seed leaves)
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Organ systems of flowering plants See Fig. 35.2
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Primary root – first to appear Eudicot Taproot system Monocot Fibrous root system Organs of flowering plants
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Root hairs are extensions of epidermal cells Organs of flowering plants
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Organs of flowering plants Root hairs dramatically increase a root’s surface area for absorbing water and nutrients
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Food storage is a function of all roots, but some ( e.g ., carrot taproots) are highly modified for storage Organs of flowering plants
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Aboveground (aerial or prop) roots give extra support Organs of flowering plants
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“Breathing” roots conduct oxygen to waterlogged roots Organs of flowering plants
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The roots of many orchids are photosynthetic Organs of flowering plants
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Organ systems of flowering plants See Fig. 35.2
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Organs of flowering plants Some plants have specialized water-storage stems Baobab trees Saguaro cacti
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Organs of flowering plants Stolons (“runners”) are horizontal, wandering, aboveground stems
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Organs of flowering plants Rhizomes ( e.g ., edible base of a ginger plant) are horizontal, belowground stems
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Organs of flowering plants Tubers ( e.g ., potatoes, yams) are the swollen ends of rhizomes, specialized for food storage
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Organs of flowering plants Bulbs are vertical, underground stems consisting mostly of the swollen bases of leaves specialized to store food
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Organs of flowering plants Tendrils are specialized branches that twist around structures to lend support
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Organs of flowering plants Thorns are rigid, sharp branches that deter potential herbivores (especially mammalian browsers)
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Organ systems of flowering plants Terminal buds generally exercise apical dominance over axillary buds See Fig. 35.2
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Organs of flowering plants See Fig. 35.6
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Organs of flowering plants Some arid-adapted plants have succulent leaves Aloe vera
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Organs of flowering plants Leaves specialized into spines help defend against herbivores
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Organ systems of flowering plants Undifferentiated meristematic cells occur in buds Whole plant growth is indeterminate , but growth of some organs is determinate See Fig. 35.2
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Organ systems of flowering plants When a cell divides, the daughter cells grow… and they may differentiate (specialize), depending especially on where they are located during development See Fig. 35.2
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This note was uploaded on 08/29/2010 for the course BIOL 1202 taught by Professor Gregg during the Spring '08 term at LSU.

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Chapter_35_and_36_to_post - Chapter 35 Plant Structure and...

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