IMPROVING PERFROMANCE Notes (1).docx - PDHPE \u2013 OPTION 1 IMPROVING PERFORMANCE TRAINING TYPES(AA It is vital that training is appropriate and specific

IMPROVING PERFROMANCE Notes (1).docx - PDHPE u2013 OPTION...

This preview shows page 1 - 3 out of 21 pages.

PDHPE – OPTION 1: I MPROVING PERFORMANCE TRAINING TYPES ( AA ) It is vital that training is appropriate and specific to the athlete. There must be integration of factors such as genetics, training, physiology, psychology, biomechanics and skills. It is important to understand how these can be manipulated. Results indicate performance so for improvement it is essential to monitor and measure results by conducting specific, valid and reliable tests. Aerobic training ( CFL ) This training makes the body more efficient at using oxygen. This involves training the larger muscle groups to combine with the cardiovascular system to supply oxygen to the athlete and their working muscles. Any training that builds the CV system is aerobic training when the energy is derived aerobically. It should follow the FITT principle, which is, 3 times a week for 20 minutes plus at between 65-85% MHR. - Continuous training : Frequency is 1-2 times per week, at 30-120 minutes, at 70% VO 2 . This is the simplest forms of training where there is no rest, at a continual effort at an intensity where the heart rate is in the aerobic training zone for at least 20 minutes. Can vary from long to slow duration between 60-85% MHR aimed at aerobic endurance, to higher intensity of 80-90% MHR, that will train the body’s ability to deal with lactic acid for long periods of time and increase the OBLA. There is a risk of overuse injuries if too much continuous training is done. Raise HR above the aerobic threshold and maintain this for more than 20 minutes staying in the high aerobic zone, this improves lactate accumulation’s effect on performance. Examples: jogging, swimming, cycling. - Fartlek training : involves alternating bursts of high-intensity activity while still maintaining the longer slower style of training. This is less structured with no predetermined structure to follow. The athlete feels the paces and their response to it, the develop self-awareness and pace judgement skills to set their own pace. Work-rest intervals can be based on the athlete. The athlete runs continually and puts some sections of higher intensity or slightly higher pace. By doing this the athlete places more stress on their system, which the body adapts to after time and this improves speed and anaerobic threshold. This helps improve game strategy and skill building, needs to have adequate rest and recovery times, it places stress on the energy system improving performance. Example: 300m in high intensity then 100m at a harder intensity then back to 300m until the breathing is normal. - Interval training : involves periods of structured work interspersed with rest periods in
Image of page 1
PDHPE – OPTION 1: I MPROVING PERFORMANCE a set pattern that are designed to match the athletes sport and conditioning levels.
Image of page 2
Image of page 3

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture