Walker_Posner - Using Social Cognitive Theory to Predict...

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Using Social Cognitive Theory to Predict Behavior by Gretchen Walker and Amy Posner James B. Wise, Faculty Mentor Abstract The purpose of this study was to test a theoretical model where self-efficacy is hypothesized to influence people’s behavioral intentions directly and indirectly through effects on outcome expectancy. Data on self-efficacy, outcome expectancy, and intention to jog two consecutive miles were collected from 115 college students enrolled in general education classes. As anticipated, path analyses indicated that efficacy had both a direct impact on intention and an indirect impact through its effects on outcome expectancy. The more efficacious people were, the more positive the outcomes they associated with jogging and the surer they were they would jog. The model tested in this study holds potentially important implications for health professionals. Based upon the model, professionals can increase the likelihood people will perform healthy activities by developing interventions that lead to stronger self-efficacy and greater awareness of positive outcomes associated with the activities. Key words: Behavior, Health Promotion, Idiosyncratic Beliefs, Sedentary Lifestyle Gretchen Walker is a Recreation, Parks and Leisure Services major with an emphasis in therapeutic recreation and a minor in gerontology at Minnesota State University, Mankato. Over the past two years, she has completed two research studies and co- presented the findings at the Undergraduate Research Conference held on campus. She is planning on developing another research study with two other therapeutic recreation students next year. Amy Posner is a Recreation, Parks and Leisure Services major with a therapeutic recreation emphasis and a minor in psychology at Minnesota State University, Mankato. Over the past two years, she has completed two research studies and co-presented the findings at the Undergraduate Research Conference and is planning on another study next year. James B. Wise, CTRS, Ph.D., is an assistant professor at Minnesota State University, Mankato. He teaches therapeutic recreation courses and advises therapeutic recreation
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students. Using Social Cognitive Theory to Predict Behavior The message, loud and clear, is that Americans are sedentary. This characteristic can lead to potentially serious health conditions such as heart disease and diabetes which, in turn, can create financial strain on society’s resources (U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, 2002). To prevent these costly conditions, health professionals are directing their efforts toward designing and implementing programs to help citizens become more physical active. One theory which can guide the efforts of health professionals is social cognitive theory (Bandura, 1986, 1998; Dzewaltoski, 1994). According to the theory, people perform behaviors (i.e., physical activities) they are
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This note was uploaded on 08/30/2010 for the course PSYC 0001x taught by Professor Smith during the Spring '10 term at Abu Dhabi University.

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Walker_Posner - Using Social Cognitive Theory to Predict...

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