{[ promptMessage ]}

Bookmark it

{[ promptMessage ]}

Rhodes & Roskos-Ewoldsen (under review)

Rhodes & Roskos-Ewoldsen (under review) - Attitude...

Info icon This preview shows pages 1–4. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Attitude and Norm Accessibility 1 Running Head: ATTITUDE AND NORM ACCESSIBILITY DRAFT DO NOT CITE WITHOUT PERMISSION Attitude and Norm Accessibility and Cigarette Smoking Nancy Rhodes and David R. Roskos-Ewoldsen University of Alabama Address correspondence concerning this manuscript to: Nancy Rhodes University of Alabama Institute for Social Science Research Box 870216 Tuscaloosa, AL 35487-0216 [email protected] Phone: (205) 348-5496 Fax: (205) 348-2849 Word count = 4,859
Image of page 1

Info icon This preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Attitude and Norm Accessibility 2 Abstract Focus theory (Cialdini, Kallgren & Reno, 1991) predicts that making a norm more salient will increase the influence of the norm on behavior for as long as the norm remains salient. The present research extends focus theory by examining the role of the chronic accessibility of normative beliefs in predicting behavior, on the assumption that chronically accessible beliefs concerning social rewards and punishments would similarly improve behavioral prediction. Participants’ reaction times to respond to computerized prompts were measured for the attitudinal target (cigarette smoking) and to the subjective norm for cigarette smoking. Attitude and norm accessibility independently accounted for significant variability in smoking behavior beyond that accounted for by traditional measures of attitude and subjective norm. Keywords: focus theory, attitude, subjective norm, cigarette smoking, accessibility
Image of page 2
Attitude and Norm Accessibility 3 Attitude and Norm Accessibility and Cigarette Smoking The study of attitudes and their relation to behavior has a long history within social psychology. In spite of early concerns about the utility of attitudes for predicting behavior (Wicker, 1969), the past three decades have seen an abundance of research demonstrating that attitudes do indeed predict behavior. The focus of recent research has largely shifted from establishing that a relationship exists to better understanding the processes through which attitudes affect behaviors (Zanna & Fazio, 1982). Attitude accessibility – the ease with which an attitude is activated in memory – has emerged as an important element in explaining these processes. A number of approaches have examined the role of chronic and temporary attitude accessibility in the attitude-behavior relation (Roskos-Ewoldsen, 1997). Similarly, norms activated in a specific situation have been shown to guide behavior in that situation (Kallgren, Reno, & Cialdini, 2000). However, the role of chronically accessible norms has not been investigated in these contexts. The present research represents an initial investigation into the role of chronically accessible subjective norms in cigarette smoking behavior. Do they explain variability in behavior beyond that explained by attitude and attitude accessibility?
Image of page 3

Info icon This preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Image of page 4
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

{[ snackBarMessage ]}

What students are saying

  • Left Quote Icon

    As a current student on this bumpy collegiate pathway, I stumbled upon Course Hero, where I can find study resources for nearly all my courses, get online help from tutors 24/7, and even share my old projects, papers, and lecture notes with other students.

    Student Picture

    Kiran Temple University Fox School of Business ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    I cannot even describe how much Course Hero helped me this summer. It’s truly become something I can always rely on and help me. In the end, I was not only able to survive summer classes, but I was able to thrive thanks to Course Hero.

    Student Picture

    Dana University of Pennsylvania ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    The ability to access any university’s resources through Course Hero proved invaluable in my case. I was behind on Tulane coursework and actually used UCLA’s materials to help me move forward and get everything together on time.

    Student Picture

    Jill Tulane University ‘16, Course Hero Intern