AnimalViruses - 8/31/10 Click to edit Master subtitle style...

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Unformatted text preview: 8/31/10 Click to edit Master subtitle style Animal Viruses HIV Marcelino Negrete * Melissa Olson * Justin Chang Joseph Lee * Verna Chen * Neil Kang 8/31/10 Introduction: Animal Virus A virus depends upon a host cell to live and replicate. They consist of one nucleic acid- either DNA or RNA- surrounded by a protein coat called a capsid. Most animal viruses, in particular, have a lipid-containing envelope, a membranous lipid structure that surrounds the capsid. Animal viruses are very diverse in many aspects: structure, replication, the mechanism in which they infect their host, and which diseases they cause. 8/31/10 Classifying Viruses The criteria for classification among animal viruses are based on morphology (size/shape), occurrence of envelopes, and type of nucleic acid. These types are based on upon the type of genetic material that makes up the virus: Double-stranded DNA. Ex: herpes I and II, smallpox, 8/31/10 More classification Animal viruses are further classified by their: Size- 20 nanometers for a small virus (ex: poliovirus) to around 0.3 micrometers for a very large virus (ex: smallpox virus) . Shape- ranges from cubical, bullet-shaped, polygonal, spherical, filamentous or helical, to a complex and layered. One of the most common morphologies is the icosahedron , which consists of 20 triangular faces that come together to form a spherical shape (herpe 8/31/10 Productive Cycle viruses are essentially inert/inactive outside a cell lack the necessary components for replication, and must therefore infect a cell in order to replicate since there are different classes of viruses (e.g. double or single stranded DNA, or double or single stranded RNA) the exact process of replication varies, however the concept is wholly the same 8/31/10...
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AnimalViruses - 8/31/10 Click to edit Master subtitle style...

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