Lecture 10 - Theseus: The Athenian Heracles Myth and...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–13. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Theseus: The Athenian Heracles Myth and History in Athens 10/02/08
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Heroic Myths: Review Mesopotamian heroic myth – Gilgamesh Pan-Hellenic heroic myth – Heracles Heroes of individual cities/countries – eponymous heroes (Ion Ionia); founders (Cadmus Thebes) Typical features of heroes : divine parentage, super-human strength and appetites, culture-bringers, impact the landscape, quest for glory/immortality
Background image of page 2
Heroic Myths as Aetiological Myths Explain the origins of cities/races and their names: Gilgamesh Uruk; Cadmus Thebes, Ion Ionia Explain origins of institutions: Heracles and foundation of Nemean Games and the Olympic Games Explain changes in the landscape: Gilgamesh and the cutting of the cedar forest; Heracles and the attempts to dry the swamps of Lernae; Heracles’ diversion of river to clean Augean stables
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Mythical Explanations for Pre-Historical and Historical Events Origins of men and women Origins of fire, medicine, wine Origins of law and the legal procedure Invention of music and musical instruments Establishment of cities and destruction of cities/civilizations Origins of religious institutions Origins of great wars
Background image of page 4
Theseus: Myth as History in Athens Theseus – one of the earliest known heroes in myth Theseus as second founder of Athens: unified Attica; invented democracy Theseus = Athenian Heracles (N.B., Theseus is Heracles’ cousin) Treated as historical figure by biographer Plutarch
Background image of page 5

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
The First Kings of Athens Cecrops – half-man, half-serpent Erichthonius Erechtheus (conflated with Erichthonius by 5 th century BC) –father of Creusa Pandion Aegeus –adopted son of Pandion Theseus
Background image of page 6
The Birth of Theseus Version I (in Plutarch): Aegeus is just traveling through Troezen from Delphi Pittheus spreads rumor that Theseus is son of Poseidon, patron god of Troezen Version II: Adds that on that same day, Aethra went to make a sacrifice to Poseidon, and was raped by him In both versions, Aegeus leaves Aethra with tokens under rock (sandals and sword); goes back to Athens
Background image of page 7

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Theseus: Childhood Name – from the tokens placed under the rock Either received name after birth, or only after Aegeus acknowledged him as son Theseus as child: visit of Heracles to Pittheus Aethra told Theseus the truth about his father when he grew up (18?); Theseus recovers items from under the rock, and leaves for Athens
Background image of page 8
The Labors of Theseus Labors – athloi in Greek Modeled on the Labors of Heracles Also cover the entire known world, but focus mainly on the road from Peloponnese to Attica (labors 1-6), and Attica itself (labor 7) Total of ALL exploits is 12, but only the first 7 or 8 are considered labors
Background image of page 9

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Hephaisteion/Theseion (ca. 449- 444 BC)
Background image of page 10
Map of Labors 1-6 (courtesy of Professor Larry Kim)
Background image of page 11

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Labor 1: Periphetes First stop: Epidaurus Son of Hephaestus Nicknamed “clubber,” because he killed passersby with his iron club Theseus killed him with his own club, and took it Cf. Heracles, who cut his club at Nemea – site of his first labor
Background image of page 12
Image of page 13
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Page1 / 50

Lecture 10 - Theseus: The Athenian Heracles Myth and...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 13. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online