Thomas%20More - Sir Thomas More (1477-1535) Son of Sir John...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–4. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Sir Thomas More (1477-1535) Son of Sir John More, a judge, More was educated at St. Antony’s School, London, and Canterbury College, London More was called to the bar and became a brilliant lawyer, entering Parliament in 1504 In 1499 he befriended Erasmus, the famous Dutch humanist While in Flanders on a diplomatic mission, More composed much of Utopia (in Latin), a travel narrative of an imaginary society, completed and published in 1516 He joined the Privy Council of Henry VIII (reigned 1509- 1547) in 1517 and succeeded Cardinal Wolsey as Lord Chancellor of England in 1529 More resigned as Lord Chancellor in 1532, citing ill health, but also over his disagreement with Henry VIII’s efforts to divorce Catherine of Aragon In 1534 More was committed to the Tower of London because he refused to swear an oath recognizing Henry as the head of the Church of England or sanction the king’s divorce His final published works, a Dialogue of Comfort agaynst Trybulacion and treatises on Christ’s Passion, were written in prison More was convicted of high treason and beheaded in 1535; he was beatified by the Catholic Church in 1886 and canonized St. Thomas More in 1935
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
More and Humanism More’s close friend, Desiderius Erasmus (ca. 1466-1536) was the most prominent representative of Northern European humanism; Erasmus’s famous work, The Praise of Folly (1511), was dedicated to More and is a satire directed against theologians and materialistic priests) “Humanism” entailed a passionate interest in Greek and Roman literature, a distrust of medieval scholastic rhetoric, and pointed criticism of clerical abuses Humanism did not mean a rejection of Christian piety or the Catholic Church per se ; while it shared some of the anticlericalism of the Protestant Reformation, for example, they were not synonymous More’s relentless defense of the Catholic Church, its doctrines, and the papacy against Lutheranism and English Protestants such as William Tyndale involved him in the persecution and execution of accused heretics and ultimately contributed to his own execution for high treason in 1535
Background image of page 2
More and Protestantism More’s ardent Catholicism was evident from his youth, when he spent several years among ascetic Carthusian monks in London’s Charterhouse, a monastery founded in 1371 While More decided to pursue the secular profession of law, marriage, and fatherhood in lieu of the Church, for the rest of his life he studied and wrote theological and moral works, including an exegesis of St. Augustine’s The City of God More assisted Henry VIII in composing the king’s A defence of the Seven Sacraments , a treatise against Luther presented to Pope Leo X, earning Henry the title “Defender of the Faith” Henry’s struggle with the papacy over his marriage to Catherine of Aragon culminated in 1534-1536 with England’s break with Rome A series of parliamentary acts established an independent
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 4
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Page1 / 8

Thomas%20More - Sir Thomas More (1477-1535) Son of Sir John...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 4. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online