William Langland - William Langland (ca. 1325-ca. 1390)...

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William Langland (ca. 1325-ca. 1390) Langland’s identity is known only from the poem Piers Plowman , where the poet refers to himself as “Long Will” He was apparently a cleric, a “beadsmen-for-the-living” who earned alms by saying prayers and psalms in the oratories of big houses Langland knew Latin and French religious and secular literature, as well as legal terminology, rhetoric, penitential literature, biblical exegesis, and theology Chaucer knew Piers Plowman , which was a “best-seller” by fourteenth century standards (there are 57 known copies, 17 dating from prior to 1400)
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Peasant’s Revolt of 1381 Also called “Tyler’s Rebellion” and the “Great Rising of 1381,” the Peasant’s Revolt reflected widespread agrarian unrest in medieval society, particularly in the wake of the Black Death of 1348 Centered mainly in Kent and Essex, the revolt was triggered by the Crown’s attempt to collect a poll tax to finance the Hundred Years’ War launched by Edward III and continued by the regents of the young Richard II, including Chaucer’s patron John of Gaunt The rebels assaulted London in June, 1381, executing both the Archbishop of Canterbury and the Lord Treasurer and burning John of Gaunt’s home, Savoy Palace The rebellion fell apart when its leader, Wat Tyler, was killed by the Lord Mayor of London, William Walworth, while parleying with the young King Richard After promising to meet the peasants’ demands, Richard led the peasant army into an ambush in which the leaders of the revolt, including the Lollard preacher John Ball, were captured and executed The king revoked his promises and levied the tax
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The Vision of Piers Plowman Piers Plowman exists in three different versions, called the A, B, and C texts The A-text dates from after 1370; the B-text from the
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William Langland - William Langland (ca. 1325-ca. 1390)...

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