Two+design+problems

Two+design+problems - the op-amp nor the variable voltage...

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1] A DC to DC converter generates an output voltage proportional to an input voltage. The output power is similar to the input power (the efficiency for power transfer is less than one). Design a circuit including the DC to DC converter shown below (input 0-5V, output 0-10kV, 10W power), having a 0-10kV output voltage proportional to a 0-10V control signal, and 10W output power. You only have the following components: the converter; one op-amp; one mosfet; a 6V, 20W voltage supply (fixed voltage); a ±12V, 0.5W voltage supply (fixed voltage); a 0-10V, 0.01W controllable voltage supply; any resistors/capacitors. (Hint: neither
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Unformatted text preview: the op-amp nor the variable voltage supply source enough current to power the DC to DC converter). (50 points) V i 0-5 V V O 0-10 kV DC-DC converter Fill the box with your circuit V control 0-10 V V O 0-10 kV 2] Design a circuit to turn on/off a 100W load. You have a two-state, 0-1V control signal to turn on/off the load. Use only the following components inside the box: one op-amp; one mosfet; a 12V, 0.5W voltage supply (fixed voltage); any resistors/capacitors. (50 points) Fill the box with your circuit 0-1V, on/off signal 100W load + 20V 300W...
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Two+design+problems - the op-amp nor the variable voltage...

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