[Meridian]_Unit_IV_Sectional_Conflict_Civil_War_and_Reconstruction

[Meridian]_Unit_IV_Sectional_Conflict_Civil_War_and_Reconstruction

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Unit IV: Sectional Conflict, Civil War, and Reconstruction ~1850-1877~ A Meridian APUSH Study Guide by John Ho and Tim Qi Important people during the era: 1. Andrew Johnson: Lincoln’s successor, a white supremacist. Wields the veto against Congressional Reconstruction plans, quickly readmits the South. He is eventually impeached and acquitted by one vote. 2. Stephen Douglas: Lincoln’s rival for Illinois Senate position. Proposes Kansas Nebraska Act, adheres to Freeport Doctrine which states that popular sovereignty overrules legislation. 3. William T. Sherman: Northern general, pioneer of “total war”. Marches through South paving a streak of destruction. 4. John Crittenden: Kentucky Senator, proposes Crittendell Compromise as a desperate effort for Union (see Legislation). 5. William Seward: Senator from New York. Unyieldingly protested against slavery arguing for the “higher law”. In 1867 as Secretary of State, he purchases Alaska from Russia for $7.2 million (“Seward’s Folly”). 6. William Lloyd Garrison: Founder of the Liberator , ardent northern abolitionist. 7. John Slidell: Southern Senator who joins the Confederacy. Previously sent to Mexico to negotiate for Texas. Sent to France during the war, but was delayed by the Trent affair. 8. Jefferson Davis: President of the Confederacy, suffered under disunion and conflicting interests within his own administration. His own states fought for their rights while he struggled for federal power to effectively wage the war. 9. Matthew Brady: Famous Civil War photographer who took pictures of the dead and wounded in the battlefields after battles. 10. George McClellan: Union general who was infamously cautious. Dubbed “young Napoleon”, he was removed and reinstated twice by Lincoln. Commands in the Peninsula Campaign (see Battles) and later Antietam where he fails to pursue Lee. 11. Dred Scott: Black slave who sued for freedom, arguing that he had lived on free soil. Supreme Court Chief Justice Tanney rules in the Dred Scott Decision that all slaves were property and could be legally held in all territories regardless of law. Furthered ruled that the Missouri Compromise was unconstitutional since Congress had no power to ban slavery. 12. Salmon Chase: A prominent Copperhead, he was an over-ambitious Secretary of Treasury under Lincoln who severely criticized his policies. 13. Benjamin Wade: Unethical “Bluff Ben” of Ohio, would succeed Johnson in presidency if he was removed from office. 14. Abraham Lincoln: Union president during the Civil War whose election would be the final cause of secession. At first, he declared that the war was to solely preserve the Union to keep Border States, later issues the Emancipation Proclamation. He advocated a quick readmission of Southern States but was assassinated in 1865, 15. Franklin Pierce: Democratic president from 1852-1856 who supported the Compromise of 1850. Undertook an ambitious expansionist policy, including the opening of Japan
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This note was uploaded on 08/31/2010 for the course AMER HIST 45213 taught by Professor Platt during the Spring '10 term at Berkeley.

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[Meridian]_Unit_IV_Sectional_Conflict_Civil_War_and_Reconstruction

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