b_ushist_frq_03 - AP® United States History 2003...

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Unformatted text preview: AP® United States History 2003 Free-Response Questions Form B The materials included in these files are intended for use by AP teachers for course and exam preparation; permission for any other use must be sought from the Advanced Placement Program®. Teachers may reproduce them, in whole or in part, in limited quantities for noncommercial, face-to-face teaching purposes. This permission does not apply to any third-party copyrights contained herein. This material may not be mass distributed, electronically or otherwise. These materials and any copies made of them may not be resold, and the copyright notices must be retained as they appear here. These materials were produced by Educational Testing Service® (ETS®), which develops and administers the examinations of the Advanced Placement Program for the College Board. The College Board and Educational Testing Service (ETS) are dedicated to the principle of equal opportunity, and their programs, services, and employment policies are guided by that principle. The College Board is a national nonprofit membership association whose mission is to prepare, inspire, and connect students to college and opportunity. Founded in 1900, the association is composed of more than 4,300 schools, colleges, universities, and other educational organizations. Each year, the College Board serves over three million students and their parents, 22,000 high schools, and 3,500 colleges through major programs and services in college admissions, guidance, assessment, financial aid, enrollment, and teaching and learning. Among its best-known programs are the SAT®, the PSAT/NMSQT®, and the Advanced Placement Program® (AP®). The College Board is committed to the principles of equity and excellence, and that commitment is embodied in all of its programs, services, activities, and concerns. For further information, visit www.collegeboard.com Copyright © 2003 College Entrance Examination Board. All rights reserved. College Board, Advanced Placement Program, AP, AP Vertical Teams, APCD, Pacesetter, Pre-AP, SAT, Student Search Service, and the acorn logo are registered trademarks of the College Entrance Examination Board. AP Central is a trademark owned by the College Entrance Examination Board. PSAT/NMSQT is a registered trademark jointly owned by the College Entrance Examination Board and the National Merit Scholarship Corporation. Educational Testing Service and ETS are registered trademarks of Educational Testing Service. Other products and services may be trademarks of their respective owners. For the College Board’s online home for AP professionals, visit AP Central at apcentral.collegeboard.com. 2003 AP® UNITED STATES HISTORY FREE-RESPONSE QUESTIONS (Form B) UNITED STATES HISTORY SECTION II Part A (Suggested writing time—45 minutes) Percent of Section II score—45 Directions: The following question requires you to construct a coherent essay that integrates your interpretation of Documents A-J and your knowledge of the period referred to in the question. High scores will be earned only by essays that both cite key pieces of evidence from the documents and draw on outside knowledge of the period. 1. Evaluate the effectiveness of Progressive Era reformers and the federal government in bringing about reform at the national level. In your answer be sure to analyze the successes and limitations of these efforts in the period 1900-1920. Document A Source: Washington Post, 1907. © 1907, The Washington Post, reprinted with permission. Copyright © 2003 by College Entrance Examination Board. All rights reserved. Available to AP professionals at apcentral.collegeboard.com and to students and parents at www.collegeboard.com/apstudents. GO ON TO THE NEXT PAGE. 2 2003 AP® UNITED STATES HISTORY FREE-RESPONSE QUESTIONS (Form B) Document B Source: The Neill-Reynolds Report, June 4, 1906. Meat scraps were also found being shoveled into receptacles from dirty floors where they were left to lie until again shoveled into barrels or into machines for chopping. These floors, it must be noted, were in most cases damp and soggy, in dark, ill-ventilated rooms, and the employees in utter ignorance of cleanliness or danger to health, expectorated at will upon them. In a word, we saw meat shoveled from filthy wooden floors, piled on tables rarely washed, pushed from room to room in rotten box carts, in all of which processes it was in the way of gathering dirt, splinters, floor filth, and the expectoration of tuberculosis and other diseased workers. Document C Source: Jane Addams, The Spirit of Youth and the City Streets, 1909. Knowing as educators do that thousands of the city youth will enter factory life at an early age as early as the state law will permit; instructed as the modern teacher is as to youth’s requirements for normal mental and muscular development, it is hard to understand the apathy in regard to youth’s inevitable experience in modern industry. Are the educators, like the rest of us, so caught in admiration of the astonishing achievements of modern industry that they forget the children themselves? Document D Source: Speech by Theodore Roosevelt, February 22, 1912. I believe in providing for direct nominations by the people, including therein direct presidential primaries for the election of delegates to the national nominating conventions. . . . I believe in the election of United States senators by direct vote. Just as actual experience convinced our people that presidents should be elected (as they are now in practice, although not in theory) by direct vote of the people instead of by indirect vote through an untrammeled electoral college, so actual experience has convinced us that senators should be elected by direct vote of the people instead of indirectly through the various legislatures. Document E Source: Clayton Antitrust Act, October 15, 1914 That it shall be unlawful for any person engaged in commerce, in the course of such commerce, either directly or indirectly to discriminate in price between different purchasers of commodities which commodities are sold for use, consumption, or resale within the United States, where the effect of such discrimination may be to substantially lessen competition or tend to create a monopoly in any line of commerce. . . . That the labor of a human being is not a commodity or article of commerce. Nothing contained in the antitrust laws shall be construed to forbid the existence and operation of labor organizations. Copyright © 2003 by College Entrance Examination Board. All rights reserved. Available to AP professionals at apcentral.collegeboard.com and to students and parents at www.collegeboard.com/apstudents. GO ON TO THE NEXT PAGE. 3 2003 AP® UNITED STATES HISTORY FREE-RESPONSE QUESTIONS (Form B) Document F Source: Herbert Croly, New Republic, Nov. 21, 1914. How can a man of President Wilson’s intelligence possibly delude himself into believing the extravagant claims which he makes on behalf of the Democratic legislative achievement? . . . How many sincere progressives follow him in believing that this legislation has made the future clear and bright with the promise of best things? . . . After every allowance has been made for his justifiable pride . . . there remains an ominous residue of sheer misunderstanding. Any man of President Wilson’s intellectual equipment who seriously asserts that the fundamental wrongs of a modern society can be easily and quickly righted as a consequence of a few laws . . . casts suspicion either upon his own sincerity or upon his grasp of the realities of modern social and industrial life. Document G Source: Hammer v. Dagenhart, 1918. [Suit was brought] by a father in his own behalf and . . . his two minor sons, one under the age of fourteen years and the other between the age of fourteen and sixteen years, employees in a cotton mill at Charlotte, North Carolina, to enjoin [stop] the enforcement of the act of Congress intended to prevent interstate commerce in the products of child labor. . . . The controlling question for this decision, is it within the authority of Congress in regulating commerce among the states to prohibit the transportation in interstate commerce of manufactured goods, the product of a factory in which . . . children under the age of fourteen and sixteen years have been employed or permitted to work more than eight hours in any day, or more than six days in any week? In our view, the necessary effect of this act is purely a state authority. Thus, the act in a two-fold sense is repugnant to the Constitution. . . . [I]t not only transcends the authority delegated to Congress over commerce, but also exerts a power as to a purely local matter. Copyright © 2003 by College Entrance Examination Board. All rights reserved. Available to AP professionals at apcentral.collegeboard.com and to students and parents at www.collegeboard.com/apstudents. GO ON TO THE NEXT PAGE. 4 2003 AP® UNITED STATES HISTORY FREE-RESPONSE QUESTIONS (Form B) Document H Source: National Archives, Photograph, 1918. Still Pictures Branch, National Archives at College Park. Copyright © 2003 by College Entrance Examination Board. All rights reserved. Available to AP professionals at apcentral.collegeboard.com and to students and parents at www.collegeboard.com/apstudents. GO ON TO THE NEXT PAGE. 5 2003 AP® UNITED STATES HISTORY FREE-RESPONSE QUESTIONS (Form B) Document I Source: W.E.B. DuBois, The Crisis, May 1919. We are returning from war! The Crisis and tens of thousands of black men were drafted into a great struggle. For bleeding France and what she means and has meant and will mean to us and humanity and against the threat of German race arrogance, we fought gladly and to the last drop of blood; for America and her highest ideals, we fought in far-off hope; for the dominant Southern oligarchy entrenched in Washington, we fought in bitter resignation. For the America that represents and gloats in lynching, disfranchisement, caste, brutality and devilish insult - for this, in the hateful upturning and mixing of things, we were forced by vindictive fate to fight also. But today we return! . . . This country of ours, despite all its better souls have done and dreamed, is yet a shameful land. Document J END OF DOCUMENTS FOR QUESTION 1 Copyright © 2003 by College Entrance Examination Board. All rights reserved. Available to AP professionals at apcentral.collegeboard.com and to students and parents at www.collegeboard.com/apstudents. 6 2003 AP® UNITED STATES HISTORY FREE-RESPONSE QUESTIONS (Form B) UNITED STATES HISTORY SECTION II Part B and Part C (Suggested total planning and writing time—70 minutes) Percent of Section II score—55 Part B Directions: Choose ONE question from this part. You are advised to spend 5 minutes planning and 30 minutes writing your answer. Cite relevant historical evidence in support of your generalizations and present your arguments clearly and logically. 2. Compare the ways in which TWO of the following reflected tensions in colonial society. Bacon’s Rebellion (1676) Pueblo Revolt (1680) Salem witchcraft trials (1692) Stono Rebellion (1739) 3. Although the power of the national government increased during the early republic, this development often faced serious opposition. Compare the motives and effectiveness of those opposed to the growing power of the national government in TWO of the following. Whiskey Rebellion, 1794 Virginia and Kentucky Resolutions, 1798-1799 Hartford Convention, 1814-1815 Nullification Crisis, 1832-1833 Part C Directions: Choose ONE question from this part. You are advised to spend 5 minutes planning and 30 minutes writing your answer. Cite relevant historical evidence in support of your generalizations and present your arguments clearly and logically. 4. Analyze the ways in which farmers and industrial workers responded to industrialization in the Gilded Age (1865-1900). 5. Describe and account for changes in the American presidency between 1960 and 1975, as symbolized by Kennedy’s “Camelot,” Johnson’s Great Society, and Nixon’s Watergate. In your answer, address the powers of the presidency and the role of the media. WHEN YOU FINISH WRITING, CHECK YOUR WORK ON SECTION II IF TIME PERMITS. END OF EXAMINATION Copyright © 2003 by College Entrance Examination Board. All rights reserved. Available to AP professionals at apcentral.collegeboard.com and to students and parents at www.collegeboard.com/apstudents. 7 ...
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This note was uploaded on 08/31/2010 for the course HIST 45213 taught by Professor Platt during the Spring '10 term at University of California, Berkeley.

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