2000 - 2000 Advanced Placement Program® Free-Response...

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Unformatted text preview: 2000 Advanced Placement Program® Free-Response Questions The materials included in these files are intended for use by AP® teachers for course and exam preparation in the classroom; permission for any other use must be sought from the Advanced Placement Program. Teachers may reproduce them, in whole or in part, in limited quantities, for face-to-face teaching purposes but may not mass distribute the materials, electronically or otherwise. These materials and any copies made of them may not be resold, and the copyright notices must be retained as they appear here. This permission does not apply to any third-party copyrights contained herein. These materials were produced by Educational Testing Service (ETS), which develops and administers the examinations of the Advanced Placement Program for the College Board. The College Board and Educational Testing Service (ETS) are dedicated to the principle of equal opportunity, and their programs, services, and employment policies are guided by that principle. The College Board is a national nonprofit membership association dedicated to preparing, inspiring, and connecting students to college and opportunity. Founded in 1900, the association is composed of more than 3,800 schools, colleges, universities, and other educational organizations. Each year, the College Board serves over three million students and their parents, 22,000 high schools, and 5,000 colleges, through major programs and services in college admission, guidance, assessment, financial aid, enrollment, and teaching and learning. Among its best-known programs are the SAT®, the PSAT/NMSQT®, the Advanced Placement Program® (AP®), and Pacesetter®. The College Board is committed to the principles of equity and excellence, and that commitment is embodied in all of its programs, services, activities, and concerns. Copyright © 2000 by College Entrance Examination Board and Educational Testing Service. All rights reserved. College Board, Advanced Placement Program, AP, and the acorn logo are registered trademarks of the College Entrance Examination Board. 2000 AP® UNITED STATES HISTORY FREE-RESPONSE QUESTIONS UNITED STATES HISTORY SECTION II Part A (Suggested writing time—45 minutes) Percent of Section II score—45 Directions: The following question requires you to construct a coherent essay that integrates your interpretation of Documents A-I and your knowledge of the period referred to in the question. High scores will be earned only by essays that both cite key pieces of evidence from the documents and draw on outside knowledge of the period. 1. How successful was organized labor in improving the position of workers in the period from 1875 to 1900 ? Analyze the factors that contributed to the level of success achieved. Use the documents and your knowledge of the period from 1875 to 1900 to construct your response. Document A Source: Historical Statistics of the United States HOURS AND WAGES OF INDUSTRIAL WORKERS 1875-1891 AVERAGE DAILY HOURS 1875 1876 1877 1878 1879 1880 1881 1882 1883 1884 1885 1886 1887 1888 1889 1890 1891 9.9 9.9 9.9 9.9 9.9 9.9 9.9 9.9 9.9 9.9 9.9 9.8 9.7 9.7 9.6 9.6 9.4 INDEX OF AVERAGE DAILY WAGES (January 1860 = 100) 169.2 158.6 146.3 140.7 137.9 142.7 160.1 165.1 166.0 168.5 169.9 170.3 170.1 170.9 170.1 172.7 172.5 Copyright © 2000 College Entrance Examination Board and Educational Testing Service. All rights reserved. AP is a registered trademark of the College Entrance Examination Board. -2- GO ON TO THE NEXT PAGE. 2000 AP® UNITED STATES HISTORY FREE-RESPONSE QUESTIONS Document B Source: Editorial, The New York Times, July 18, 1877 . . . [T]he strike is apparently hopeless, and must be regarded as nothing more than a rash and spiteful demonstration of resentment by men too ignorant or too reckless to understand their own interests. . . . But if the strike on the Baltimore and Ohio Road is a foolish one, its history up to the present time shows that those who are engaged in it are not only bold and determined, but that they have the sympathy of a large part of the community in which they live. . . . Copyright © 2000 College Entrance Examination Board and Educational Testing Service. All rights reserved. AP is a registered trademark of the College Entrance Examination Board. -3- GO ON TO THE NEXT PAGE. 2000 AP® UNITED STATES HISTORY FREE-RESPONSE QUESTIONS Document C Source: Thomas Nast cartoon in Harper’s Weekly, 1878 Photo Courtesy of the Newberry Library. Copyright © 2000 College Entrance Examination Board and Educational Testing Service. All rights reserved. AP is a registered trademark of the College Entrance Examination Board. -4- GO ON TO THE NEXT PAGE. 2000 AP® UNITED STATES HISTORY FREE-RESPONSE QUESTIONS Document D Source: The testimony of a machinist before the Senate Committee on Labor and Capital, 1883 Question: Is there any difference between the conditions under which machinery is made now and those which existed ten years ago? Answer: A great deal of difference. Question: State the differences as well as you can. Answer: Well, the trade has been subdivided and those subdivisions have been again subdivided, so that a man never learns the machinist’s trade now. Ten years ago he learned, not the whole of the trade, but a fair portion of it. In the case of making the sewing-machine, for instance, you find that the trade is so subdivided that a man is not considered a machinist at all. In that way machinery is produced a great deal cheaper than it used to be formerly, and in fact, through this system of work, 100 men are able to do now what it took 300 or 400 men to do fifteen years ago. Document E Source: Western Union Telegraph Company employee contract, 1883 I, [name] of [city] in consideration of my present reemployment by the Western Union Telegraph Co. hereby promise and agree to and with the said company that I will forthwith abandon any and all membership, connection or affiliation with any organization or society, whether secret or open, which in anywise attempts to regulate the conditions of my services or the payment thereof while in the employment now undertaken. I hereby further agree that I will, while in the employ of said company, render good and faithful service to the best of my ability, and will not in anywise renew or re-enter upon any relations or membership whatsoever in or with any such organizations or society. Dated . . . . . 1883. Signed . . . . . Address . . . . . (Seal) Accepted for the Western Union Telegraph Co. . . . . . , Superintendent Copyright © 2000 College Entrance Examination Board and Educational Testing Service. All rights reserved. AP is a registered trademark of the College Entrance Examination Board. -5- GO ON TO THE NEXT PAGE. 2000 AP® UNITED STATES HISTORY FREE-RESPONSE QUESTIONS Document F Source: Frank Leslie’s Illustrated Newspaper, January 8, 1887 Culver Pictures Copyright © 2000 College Entrance Examination Board and Educational Testing Service. All rights reserved. AP is a registered trademark of the College Entrance Examination Board. -6- GO ON TO THE NEXT PAGE. 2000 AP® UNITED STATES HISTORY FREE-RESPONSE QUESTIONS Document G Source: Coroner’s list of the killed, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, July 7, 1892 (The New York Times, July 8, 1892) The following are the names of those killed yesterday as furnished by the Coroner: J. W. KLINE, Pinkerton detective, of Chicago JOSEPH SOTAK, a striker of Homestead PETER FERRIS, a laborer at the Homestead plant SILAS WAIN of Homestead, who was watching the battle from the mill yard JOHN E. MORRIS, employed in the steel works at Homestead THOMAS WELDON of Homestead EDWARD CONNORS, a Pinkerton detective of New York BORITZ MARKOWISKY of Homestead PETER HEISE of Homestead ROBERT FOSTER of Homestead WILLIAM JOHNSON of Homestead A number of others are reported dead, but the Coroner has no official notification of their death. Copyright © 2000 College Entrance Examination Board and Educational Testing Service. All rights reserved. AP is a registered trademark of the College Entrance Examination Board. -7- GO ON TO THE NEXT PAGE. 2000 AP® UNITED STATES HISTORY FREE-RESPONSE QUESTIONS Document H Source: United States Supreme Court, In re Debs, 1895 The national government, given power by the Constitution to regulate interstate commerce, has by express statute assumed jurisdiction over such commerce when carried upon railroads. It is charged, therefore, with the duty of keeping those highways of interstate commerce free from obstruction, for it has always been recognized as one of the powers and duties of a government to remove obstructions from the highway under its control . . . Document I Source: Testimony of Samuel Gompers before a commission established by the House of Representatives on the Relations and Conditions of Capital and Labor, 1899 The working people find that improvements in the methods of production and distribution are constantly being made, and unless they occasionally strike, or have the power to enter upon a strike, the improvements will all go to the employer and all the injuries to the employees. . . . The American Republic was not established without some suffering, without some sacrifice, and no tangible right has yet been achieved in the interest of the people unless it has been secured by sacrifices and persistency. END OF DOCUMENTS FOR QUESTION 1 Copyright © 2000 College Entrance Examination Board and Educational Testing Service. All rights reserved. AP is a registered trademark of the College Entrance Examination Board. -8- GO ON TO THE NEXT PAGE. 2000 AP® UNITED STATES HISTORY FREE-RESPONSE QUESTIONS UNITED STATES HISTORY SECTION II Part B and Part C (Suggested total planning and writing time—70 minutes) Percent of Section II score—55 Part B Directions: Choose ONE question from this part. You are advised to spend 5 minutes planning and 30 minutes writing your answer. Cite relevant historical evidence in support of your generalizations and present your arguments clearly and logically. 2. Analyze the cultural and economic responses of TWO of the following groups to the Indians of North America before 1750. British French Spanish 3. Assess the moral arguments and political actions of those opposed to the spread of slavery in the context of TWO of the following. Missouri Compromise Mexican War Compromise of 1850 Kansas-Nebraska Act Part C Directions: Choose ONE question from this part. You are advised to spend 5 minutes planning and 30 minutes writing your answer. Cite relevant historical evidence in support of your generalizations and present your arguments clearly and logically. 4. To what extent did the United States achieve the objectives that led it to enter the First World War? 5. Discuss, with respect to TWO of the following, the view that the 1960’s represented a period of profound cultural change. Education Gender roles Music Race relations When you finish writing, check your work on Section II if time permits. Copyright © 2000 College Entrance Examination Board and Educational Testing Service. All rights reserved. AP is a registered trademark of the College Entrance Examination Board. -9- GO ON TO THE NEXT PAGE. 2000 AP® UNITED STATES HISTORY FREE-RESPONSE QUESTIONS This page may be used for planning your answers. END OF EXAMINATION Copyright © 2000 College Entrance Examination Board and Educational Testing Service. All rights reserved. AP is a registered trademark of the College Entrance Examination Board. -10- ...
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This note was uploaded on 08/31/2010 for the course HIST 45213 taught by Professor Platt during the Spring '10 term at Berkeley.

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