7.3 Jackson and Wilson - AP US History Document Based...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–4. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
AP US History Document Based Question Directions: The following question requires you to construct an essay that integrates your interpretation of Documents and your knowledge of the period referred to in the question. In the essay you should strive to support your assertions both by citing key pieces of evidence from the documents and by drawing on your knowledge of the period. "Under Jacksonian Democracy it seemed in the public interest to separate banking and government; under Wilsonian Progressivism it seemed in the public interest to join them." Compare the economic philosophies behind each view and explain the conditions that brought the change from one to the other. Document A Jackson Vetoes the Bank Re-charter (1832) “As the [Bank] charter had yet four years to run, and as a renewal now was not necessary to the successful prosecution of its business, it was to have been expected that the Bank itself, conscious of its purity and proud of its character, would have withdrawn its application for the present, and demanded the severest scrutiny into all its transactions. . . . The Bank is professedly established as an agent of the Executive Branch of the government, and its constitutionality is maintained on that ground. Neither upon the propriety of present action nor upon the provisions of this act was the Executive consulted. It has had no opportunity to say that it neither ends nor wants an agent clothed with such powers and favored by such exemptions. There is nothing in its legitimate functions which makes it necessary or proper. Whatever interest or influence, whether public or private, has given birth to this act, it cannot be found either in the wishes or necessities of the Executive Department, by which present action is deemed premature, and the powers conferred upon its agent not only unnecessary but dangerous to the government and country.” Document B Boston Daily Atlas , quoted in the Daily National Intelligencer (Washington, D.C.), August 9, 1832. “The Bank veto . ... is the most wholly radical and basely Jesuitical document that ever emanated from any administration, in any country. It violates all our established notions and feelings. It arraigns Congress for not asking permission of the Executive before daring to legislate on the matter, and fairly intimates a design to save the two Houses in future from all such trouble. ... It falsely and wickedly alleges that the rich and powerful throughout the country are waging a war of oppression against the poor and the weak; and attempts to justify the President on the ground of its being his duty thus to protect the humble when so assailed. Finally, it unblushingly denies that
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
the Supreme Court is the proper tribunal to decide upon the constitutionality of the laws!!”
Background image of page 2
Document C Currency Act of 1834. United States Statutes at Large , 23rd Cong., Sess. I, Chp. 95, p. 699-700. Approved, June 28, 1834.
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 4
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Page1 / 7

7.3 Jackson and Wilson - AP US History Document Based...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 4. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online