3.5 Causes of the Civil War - Causes of the Civil War AP...

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Causes of the Civil War AP United States History
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The Missouri Compromise The Missouri Compromise was an effort by congress to defuse the sectional and political rivalries triggered by the request of Missouri in 1819 for admission as a state in which slavery would be legal. At the time, the United States was made up of 22 states (11 free and 11 slave) Admission as Missouri as a slave state would upset the balance. After the senate and the House passed different bills and deadlock threatened, a compromise bill was worked out by Henry Clay of Kentucky in 1820. The compromise stated that, 1. Missouri was to be admitted as a slave state and Maine admitted as a free state, 2. Except for Missouri, slavery was to be excluded from the Louisiana Purchase lands north of 36 30. The Missouri compromise was criticized by many southerners because it established the principle that Congress could make laws regarding slavery.
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Tariff of Abominations Congress had raised duties in 1816 and again in 1824 The tariff of 1824 created high duties on imported agricultural goods, imported textiles, and iron. When congress raised the tariff even higher in 1828, South Carolina’s Legislature published the “South Carolina Exposition and Protest”, stating that the tariff was unconstitutional and advancing the nullification theory. U.S. VP John C. Calhoun was the secret author of this document. When congress passed another tariff in 1832, moderating some of the duties of the prior act, South Carolina’s legislature overwhelmingly adopted an ordinance of nullification and threatened secession. In November 1932, President Andrew Jackson sent seven small vessels to Charleston with orders for instant action. In December, he issued a “Proclamation On Nullification”, stating that the Union was perpetual and under the constitution there was no right of secession. In January, 1933, he sent Congress the Force Bill, reaffirming the President’s powers to call up State militias and the army and navy to stop any rebellion.
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The Force Bill passed in the Senate 32-1 and on March 1 st the Senate passed the Compromise Tariff. The nullifiers repealed their nullification ordinance on March 11
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This note was uploaded on 08/31/2010 for the course HIST 45213 taught by Professor Platt during the Spring '10 term at University of California, Berkeley.

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3.5 Causes of the Civil War - Causes of the Civil War AP...

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